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looking beyond borders

foreign policy and global economy

Archive for the category “Asia”

Why China Won’t Rescue North Korea

Over the last two decades, Chinese relations with North Korea have deteriorated drastically behind the scenes, as China has tired of North Korea’s insolent behaviour and reassessed its own interests on the peninsula. Today, China is no longer wedded to North Korea’s survival. In the event of a conflict or the regime’s collapse, Chinese forces would intervene to a degree not previously expected—not to protect Beijing’s supposed ally but to secure its own interests.

Read Here – Foreign Affairs

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Is Indo-Pacific The ‘New’ Pivot?

A free, open, prosperous and inclusive Indo-Pacific serves the long-term interests of all countries in the region. But if this concept turns out to be a divisive vision for Asia, both India and China must oppose it since it will destabilise the region and add fuel to the fire in the delicate bilateral relationship. As two large emerging powers, India and China have huge stakes in Asia’s future. Obviously they will benefit from a cooperative, not a confrontational, relationship.

Read Here – The National Interest

The Rise, Fall, And Rebirth Of The ‘Quad’

Ten years ago, an American, an Australian, an Indian, and a Japanese walked into a room in Manila. This was no joke. They were representing their governments at a quadrilateral meeting also known as “the Quad.” The initiative, meant to facilitate conversation and cooperation between the four maritime democracies in the context of the rise of China and India, lasted from mid-2006 to early 2008. Since it fell apart, analysts have perhaps spent more time discussing it than the officials did in implementing it. Now, the Quad has been revived.

Read Here – War On The Rocks

How Abe And Modi Can Save The Indo-Pacific

Indian Prime Minister Narendra Modi with his Japanese counterpart Shinzo Abe arrive at the India-Japan Business Summit in Gandhinagar, Gujarat on September 14, 2017.

 

The relationship between the two countries—historically strategically distant—has grown increasingly robust under the stewardship of Indian Prime Minister Narendra Modi and Abe, with regular high-level summitry (Abe traveled to Delhi to visit Modi last month) combined with increasingly frequent and deepening exchanges at the diplomatic, defense, and business levels.

Read Here – Foreign Affairs

Five Key Points From Donald Trump’s Talks With Xi Jinping And What They Mean For US-China Relations

President Donald J. Trump and President Xi of China/ Official White House Photo by Shealah Craighead

Chinese President Xi Jinping and his US counterpart Donald Trump wrapped up their talks as Trump’s first presidential visit to China drew to a close. In a joint press conference after their talks, Trump again congratulated Xi on his enhanced political status after last month’s Communist Party national congress.

Read More – South China Morning Post

What China Wants From Trump

In most Asian capitals, as in Washington, Trump’s arrival in the region for an 11-day trip has prompted acute anxiety about what he might say or do. This is especially true regarding trade issues and North Korea, the two focal points of the U.S. administration’s still-nascent Asia policy. But in Beijing, Xi and the rest of the Chinese leadership can be more sanguine: since last November, China has succeeded in appearing to more and more of Asia as the steady, stable great power alongside an unpredictable and undependable United States.

Read Here – Foreign Affairs

Why the US Is No Threat To China, But A Remilitarised Japan, Led By Shinzo Abe, May Well Be

The election success means Abe is stronger than ever. Post-election polls showed parties in favour of amending the US-drafted charter carried nearly 80 per cent of the seats in the lower house election. Never before have Japanese politicians been so vocally in favour of military reform.

Read Here – South China Morning Post

China’s Planning A 1,000km Tunnel To Divert Water Away From One Of India’s Largest Rivers

China is working on an incredibly ambitious water diversion project involving the Brahmaputra, one of India’s largest rivers, which may become another point of tension between the two Asian neighbours. Chinese engineers are testing techniques that could be used to build a 1,000-kilometre (km) tunnel—the world’s longest—to carry water from Tibet to Xinjiang, a barren region in northwest China, according to a report in the South China Morning Post.

Read Here – Quartz

China Vs. Japan: Asia’s Other Great Game

For millennia, China and Japan have been locked in a relationship even more mutually dependent, competitive and influential than the much more recent one between Washington and Beijing. Each has sought to dominate, or at least be the most influential in, Asia, and the relations of each with their neighbours has at various points been directly shaped by their rivalry.

Read Here – The National Interest

Myanmar’s Internet Disrupted Society — And Fuelled Extremists

Farmers in oxcarts, Buddhist monks, businesspeople launching startups—they all now have the world at their thumbs. But what is it like to endure, in just a few short years, the transition Western countries have had a quarter century to work through? Tech is powerful anywhere, but it’s particularly powerful when it’s brand-new and easy to exploit.

Read Here – Wired

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