Advertisements

looking beyond borders

foreign policy and global economy

Mohammed bin Salman Is Having a Fire Sale Of His Political Power

The two most important facts about Aramco are now directly in tension with one another. It has been central to the power of the House of Saud precisely because the royal family has had it under tight control. At the same time, Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman has made it central to his plan to transform the country, known as Vision 2030, by promising to sell shares of the company to investors—thus giving them greater control over it.

Read Here – Foreign Policy

Advertisements

Should China Police The Strait Of Hormuz?

During the late June 2019 crisis in the Persian Gulf, the American president made a startlingly candid observation (even by his standards): “China gets 91 percent of its oil from the Straight (sic), Japan 62 percent, and many other countries likewise. So why are we protecting the shipping lanes for other countries (many years) for zero compensation. All of these countries should be protecting their own ships …”

Read Here – The National Interest

The East India Company Invented Corporate Lobbying

It’s become commonplace for corporate lobbyists to write bills passed in state legislatures. The influence of corporate lobbyists in the U.S. Congress may be more subtle, but the combined power of lobbyists, many of them former politicians, is a major driver of the influence of corporate power in American government today.

Read Here – JStor Daily

The Rise of Nationalism After the Fall Of The Berlin Wall

Following the fall of the Berlin Wall in November 1989, open societies were triumphant and international cooperation became the dominant creed. Thirty years later, however, nationalism has turned out to be much more powerful and disruptive than internationalism.

Read Here – Project Syndicate

Why Africa’s Future Will Determine The Rest Of The World’s

How Africa’s population evolves, and how the continent’s economies develop, will affect nearly everything people near and far assume about their lives today.

Read Here – World Politics Review

China Says RCEP Economies Committed To Work With India To Resolve Lingering Trade Deal Issues

China said the small number of issues standing in the way of the Regional Comprehensive Economic Partnership (RCEP) could be resolved by the end of the year, adding member states were also ready to work with India to address outstanding issues. Fifteen nations from the Asia-Pacific region – the 10 ASEAN nations plus Japan, China, South Korea, Australia and New Zealand – agreed on the outline of the trade pact earlier this week.

Read Here – South China Morning Post

Pakistan’s Massive March Calls Out Military Overreach

Pakistan’s powerful military is struggling to keep its grip on power as the country seethes with anger over the rising cost of living caused by sluggish economic growth, political victimisation, narrowing space for freedom of expression, and the militarisation of politics.

Read Here – The Diplomat

 

The End Of Neoliberalism And The Rebirth Of History

For 40 years, elites in rich and poor countries alike promised that neoliberal policies would lead to faster economic growth, and that the benefits would trickle down so that everyone, including the poorest, would be better off. Now that the evidence is in, is it any wonder that trust in elites and confidence in democracy have plummeted?

Read Here – Project Syndicate

Can India’s Prime Minister Succeed Even As The Economy Plummets?

The dominance of the BJP, however, has surprisingly little do with its economic track record. Modi has succeeded politically despite—not because of—the economy, which is in the midst of a protracted downturn that began on his watch. For his second term, the prime minister has doubled down on the grand economic promises he made in his 2014 campaign and gone still further, setting a goal of turning India into a $5 trillion economy by 2024. But his government has struggled to articulate just how it will bring about India’s economic renewal.

Read Here – Foreign Affairs

Might India Start The Next South Asia Crisis?

Instead of an attack in India that initiates crisis, what if one arose following a proactive Indian operation to seize territory over the Line of Control (LOC) in the portion of the disputed territory of Kashmir controlled by Pakistan? Indian leaders have contemplated such operations in the past, and the current government in India has demonstrated its willingness to take considerable risks, including in the February 2019 crisis.

Read Here – WarOnTheRocks

Post Navigation

%d bloggers like this: