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looking beyond borders

foreign policy and global economy

China will scrap limit on presidential term, meaning Xi Jinping can stay on

China will remove the constitutional restriction on the maximum number of terms the president and vice-president can serve, Xinhua reported, paving the way for President Xi Jinping to stay on beyond 2023.

Read Here – South China Morning Post

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Iran Among The Ruins

Washington seems to believe that rolling back Iranian influence would restore order to the Middle East. But that expectation rests on a faulty understanding of what caused it to break down in the first place. Iran did not cause the collapse, and containing Iran will not bring back stability.

Read Here – Foreign Affairs

Cold War II

A quarter-century after the end of the Cold War, the world unexpectedly finds itself in a second one. This state of affairs was anything but inevitable, and it is in neither side’s interest to escalate tensions further.

Read Here – Project Syndicate

The Game Of Chicken In The Arabian Sea

India must have an alternative plan ready for the Maldives, just in case naval posturing does not beget an optimal solution. This does not have to involve boots on the ground. The Indian Navy must be prepared for a sustained presence around the island state, even as New Delhi ratchets up the diplomatic heat to resolve the political impasse. In the game of brinkmanship afoot in the Indian Ocean littorals, India must not be the first one to blink.

Read Here – Mint

Sharif’s Many Hits And Misses

Mian Nawaz Sharif has had a fascinating political career. Over the past three decades he has been elected thrice to the highest political office, with decisive mandates. He was also removed from office on three occasions by moves crafted by the army brass, backed by institutions like the National Accountability Bureau.

Read Here – BusinessLine

What Trump Needs To Know About Iranians

If the United States wants to one day improve its relations with Iran, it must gain the trust of the Iranian people and adopt policies that reflect the realities on the ground in Iran. To this end, the Trump administration ought to take note of the momentous shifts in public attitudes among Iranians. If not, renewed hawkishness may cause a serious backlash with unpredictable consequences.

Read Here – Al-Monitor

Indian Deal On Key Iranian Port A Potential Check On China’s Regional Ambitions

India has taken over a strategically important port in Iran, giving it a potential bulwark against China’s growing influence in the region and access to Afghanistan and Europe that bypasses Pakistan. India signed the lease on Saturday for Chabahar port in eastern Iran about 90km west of the Pakistani port of Gwadar, which is being developed by China. Gwadar is the centrepiece of a massive Chinese infrastructure programme in Pakistan and is expected to be the site of China’s second overseas military base, according to a US Department of Defence report last year.

Read Here – South China Morning Post

India, Iran And A Divided Middle East

The first presidential visit from Iran since 2003 comes at a complicated moment in Tehran. For the Islamic Republic of Iran, it is the best of times and the worst of times. Iran’s regional influence has never been as expansive as it is today. Yet, there is a huge push back against Tehran from some of its Arab neighbours, Israel and the Trump Administration.

Read Here – The Indian Express

The Backlash To Belt And Road

When Beijing announced its One Belt, One Road initiative five years ago, the global reaction was immediate and pronounced. OBOR, as it became known, was hailed as a transformative effort to deploy China’s economic might in service of its strategic goals. By going out of their way to reject analogies to the United States’ Marshall Plan in Europe, Chinese leaders in fact invited the comparison.

Read Here – Foreign Affairs

What Happens When A Major World City Runs Dry?

Residents of this coastal city of 4 million have begun stockpiling bottled water and lining up at natural springs. The reason? Cape Town, a global tourist destination and South Africa’s second-largest city, may soon switch off its taps. Dams are running low in the midst of an extreme three-year drought, one that has been compounded by extended delays in new infrastructure investments. “Day Zero” — the date when officials plan to shut down the municipal supply and start dispensing rations from some 200 collection points — is now expected to arrive in June, a month after the winter rains usually begin.

Read Here – Foreign Policy

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