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looking beyond borders

foreign policy and global economy

The Long-term Cost Of Saudi Succession Shake-Up

King Salman bin Abdul-Aziz Al Saud’s decision to remove Crown Prince Mohammed bin Nayef and promote his favorite son, Defense Minister Mohammed bin Salman, has been long anticipated. It raises profound questions about the future stability of America’s oldest ally in the Middle East. 

Read Here – Al Monitor

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The Expanding Empire Of Jeff Bezos

With a fortune largely tied to his 78.9 million shares of Amazon, the net worth of Jeff Bezos continues to be on the rise. Just days ago, Amazon shares reached all-time highs after the company’s ambitious acquisition of Whole Foods. This puts Bezos just $4 billion away from displacing Bill Gates as the world’s number one billionaire – and if the stock continues upwards, he could take the title any day.

Read Here – Visual Capitalist

European Allies Want Used F-16s, But Are There Enough To Go Around?

American allies across Europe want used F-16 fighter jets, but there might not be enough planes to go around, U.S. Air Force officials say. First produced in 1974 by General Dynamics and built since 1993 by Lockheed and its successor Lockheed Martin, the F-16 is attractive to some NATO allies that are increasing or planning to increase defense spending and weapons purchases in the wake of Russia’s 2014 annexation of Crimea.

Read Here – Defense One

What Happens When Putin Goes — And Will He Ever?

Vladimir Putin has been such a dominant figure in international relations since coming to power in 1999 that it’s hard to imagine a world without him. Moreover, Russia is so large — spanning 11 time zones — and so diverse in ethnic and socioeconomic terms, that’s it’s equally difficult to foresee Russian reaction to the absence of someone who has really functioned much like the czars of old. But nothing is eternal, not even in Mother Russia, so sooner or later, things will change.

Read Here – Ozy

Sons, Mothers, Money And Memory: Theories About The Lee Kuan Yew Family Feud

The dysfunctional relationship among the Lee siblings might have stayed behind closed doors but for two inconvenient details. First, they were fighting over the house of Lee Kuan Yew, the man who was virtually synonymous with Singapore for five decades. Second, the eldest among the siblings is the current Prime Minister of Singapore, Lee Hsien Loong.

Read Here – South China Morning Post

Has Asia Learned From The 1997 Crisis?

Reform is always easier when a crisis leaves policy makers no other options. But without further change, Asia will continue to rely too much on debt instead of productivity gains for growth. In poorer nations, improvements in household welfare will lag. As in the years before 1997, economic irregularities could build up to the point where the region faces another crisis. Will the next Kim Dae-jungs be there when you need them?

Read Here – Bloomberg View

We Will Be Back Soon…

We are taking a short vacation, and will be back soon. Meanwhile, do go through all the interesting articles already there for you to discover and read.

Editor

This Is The Real Story Behind The Economic Crisis Unfolding In Qatar

The Qatar crisis proves two things: the continued infantilisation of the Arab states, and the total collapse of the Sunni Muslim unity supposedly created by Donald Trump’s preposterous attendance at the Saudi summit two weeks ago.

Read Here – Independent

Duration of Diplomatic Dispute is Key to Qatar Impact

How to Hate Each Other Peacefully In A Democracy

It is difficult to imagine it now, but continental Europe struggled with foundational divides—with periodic warnings of civil war—as recently as the 1950s. Belgium, Switzerland, Austria, and the Netherlands were divided into ideologically opposed subcultures, sometimes called “spiritual families” or “pillars.” These countries became models of “consensual democracy,” where the subcultures agreed to share power through creative political arrangements.

The Kingmaker Clan Behind Xi Jinping

File photo of Chinese President Xi Jinping

Beijing, naturally, is where the action happens in China’s political theater. But to really understand the country’s complex power structure — and the intense, ongoing struggle for supremacy — it is also important to look backstage. That would be Guangdong Province, nearly 2,000km to the south.

Read Here – Nikkei Asian Review

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