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looking beyond borders

foreign policy and global economy

‘The Internet Is Broken’: @ev Is Trying To Salvage It

Evan Williams is the guy who opened up Pandora’s box. Until he came along, people had few places to go with their overflowing emotions and wild opinions, other than writing a letter to the newspaper or haranguing the neighbours. Mr. Williams — a Twitter founder, a co-creator of Blogger — set everyone free, providing tools to address the world. In the history of communications technology, it was a development with echoes of Gutenberg.

Read Here – The New York Times

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The Six-Day War At 50

The world is about to mark the 50th anniversary of the June 1967 war between Israel and Egypt, Jordan, and Syria – a conflict that continues to stand out in a region with a modern history largely defined by violence. The war lasted less than a week, but its legacy remains pronounced a half-century later.

Read Here – Project Syndicate

China Isn’t Rising—It’s Merely Outlasting Other Nations

East Asia has usually been unipolar, and often hegemonic. Today the region has returned to unipolarity so quickly that almost nobody has noticed. Whether China can again become a hegemon, however, is far less certain.

Read Here – The National Interest

Iran’s Long Economic Journey

The landslide re-election of Iran’s president, Hassan Rouhani, reflects the by now familiar pattern of continuity and change that has characterised Iran’s major elections over the last two decades. But it also stands out in one key way: Rouhani has remained popular despite pursuing painful macroeconomic stabilisation.

Read Here – Project Syndicate

Why Fragile States Matter

After the stunning collapse of the Iranian regime in 1979, country risk analysts everywhere became desirous of some method to better calculate the risk of political instability in countries across the world. For many, the holy grail became some type of quantitative index that would rank countries based on their potential for instability.

Read Here – The Cipher Brief

International Trade: Where Human Insight Is Still In Demand

It’s an issue when emerging markets are expected to contribute about 60 per cent to global GDP growth up to 2021, according to an International Monetary Fund forecast. China alone currently contributes to more than 30 per cent of global growth, trumping the US. Not surprisingly opportunities for human-driven insights are increasing in these markets.

Read Here – Raconteur

Xi Jinping’s Imperialistic Ambitions Have Beaten Modi’s Soft-Power Diplomacy Right To India’s Doorstep

There are two major reasons China is able to move much faster than India on deals and aid, including a one-party system that gives Xi decision-making power far beyond what Modi is able to command. The world’s second-largest economy, China has far more resources, from the world’s largest foreign reserves, to some of its biggest infrastructure companies.

Read Here – Quartz

Saudi Arabia’s Dream Of Becoming The Dominant Arab And Muslim Power In The World Has Gone Down In Flames

The attempt by Saudi Arabia and Gulf oil states to achieve hegemony in the Arab and Sunni Muslim worlds has proved disastrous for almost everybody. The capture of east Aleppo by the Syrian Army and the likely fall of Mosul to the Iraqi Army means defeat for that the Sunni Arabs in a great swathe of territory stretching from Iran to the Mediterranean.

Read Here – Independent

Get Ready For The Next Big Privacy Backlash Against Facebook

Data mining is such a prosaic part of our online lives that it’s hard to sustain consumer interest in it, much less outrage. The modern condition means constantly clicking against our better judgement. We go to bed anxious about the surveillance apparatus lurking just beneath our social media feeds, then wake up to mindlessly scroll, Like, Heart, Wow, and Fave another day.

Read Here – Wired

Saudi Arabia Turns To Trump For investments

Just a few years back, the business relationship between the United States and Saudi Arabia was pretty simple: the Americans bought oil, and the Saudis spent much of what they earned on equipment to keep the crude flowing and on planes, tanks and missiles to protect their borders.

Read Here – Dawn

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