Advertisements

looking beyond borders

foreign policy and global economy

What Drives Chinese Arms Sales In Central Asia?

Indeed, with the collapse of a purported Sino-Russian economic-military division of labor, a growing economic interest in Central Asia as a main corridor in the Belt and Road Initiative, and an on-going anti-Uyghur separatist discourse, Central Asia is an obvious choice for a Chinese foreign military base.

Read Here – The Diplomat

Advertisements

The Ghosts Of Past Wars Live On In A Critical Archive

The United States will soon deploy soldiers to Afghanistan born after the terrorist attacks of Sept. 11, 2001. Next August will mark the 30th anniversary of Iraq’s invasion of Kuwait, along with the subsequent American-led military buildup leading to Operation Desert Storm in January 1991. The American military has been directly engaged in the “greater Middle East” since.

Read Here – WarOnTheRocks

The World Isn’t Ready For Climate Refugees

Rising sea levels, wildfires, drought or a slow-moving hurricane can all threaten your way of life as surely as a bomb. But unlike victims of war for whom the causes and effects of the threats are clear and codified, there are no protections for environmental migrants. That’s despite World Bank estimates that tens of millions of people could be climate refugees by 2050.

Read Here – FiveThirtyEight

India’s Democratic Dictatorship

Under Prime Minister Narendra Modi, India’s character is being transformed by a government with no regard for institutions, understandings, and conventions maintained since independence. If this trend continues, India may well soon cease to be the country which Mahatma Gandhi struggled to free.

Read Here – Project Syndicate

The Netanyahu Show Is Finally Fizzling Out

In much of the West, Netanyahu is perceived as a tough guy, cozying up to strongmen in European capitals and to President Donald Trump in Washington, but many Israelis understand there is a good deal of bluster behind this image. Though he is now unwilling to discuss a two-state solution to the Palestinian conflict, Netanyahu has also done little to preclude it; he has authorized far less settlement construction than prime ministers who preceded him.

Read Here – Bloomberg Opinion

Are Chinese Companies Using Cambodia To Evade US tariffs?

Chinese companies appear to be trying to dodge the tariffs imposed by the United States as part of a punishing trade war by redirecting their shipments through Cambodia. China’s exports to Southeast Asian country have been steadily rising since start of trade war. Meanwhile, Cambodia’s exports to US in first three months of 2019 rose 22 per cent to US$820 million.

Read Here – South China Morning Post

As China Surges, Europe Is On The Menu

China’s naval expansion and commercial push into Europe are aimed at redefining the global trade and security system to the detriment of the democratic West. Europe and the U.S. need to wake up to the challenge.

Read Here – American Interest

East India Company: The Original Corporate Raiders

At the beginning of the 19th century, as the British economic historian Angus Maddison has demonstrated, India’s share of the world economy was around 23 per cent, almost as large as all of Europe put together. (It had been 27 per cent in 1700, when the Mughal Emperor Aurangzeb’s treasury raked in £100m in tax revenues alone.) By the time the British departed India, it had dropped to just over 3 per cent. The reason was simple: India was governed for the benefit of Britain. Britain’s rise for 200 years was substantially financed by its depredations in India.

Read Here – The New Statesman America

How John Bolton Broke The National Security Council

Mr. Bolton’s legacy is not of destruction overseas, but dysfunction in Washington. To pursue his own policy agenda and serve an erratic president, in just 17 months Mr. Bolton effectively destroyed the National Security Council system, the intricate structure that governed American foreign policy since the end of World War II. Mr. Bolton’s most lasting legacy will be dismantling the structure that has kept American foreign policy from collapsing into chaos, and finally unshackling an irregular commander-in-chief.

Read Here – The New York Times

China Will Rein In Hong Kong Through Its Economy

Just what form “struggle” will take in Hong Kong remains uncertain. In the end, Xi must make the difficult choice between his political instincts: crack down on Hong Kong’s unruly dissenters and bring them to heel or tolerate an uncomfortable degree of continued autonomy as the price of preserving the city’s important role in the Chinese economy—especially regarding financial links to the outside world. He can’t have both.

Read Here – The National Interest

Post Navigation

%d bloggers like this: