looking beyond borders

foreign policy and global economy

The U.S. Election Matters To India Because Of China

A significant amount of the commentary in India about the upcoming US presidential election’s impact has focused on what Donald Trump and Joe Biden have said or not said about Kashmir. However, that misses a crucial point: Broader foreign policy decisions will have more significant implications for India. Particularly consequential will be how a second Trump administration or a Biden administration perceive and approach China…

Read Here | The Indian Express

US-India Military Alliance Comes Into View

The mystery about the awkward timing of the so-called 2+2 US-Indian security dialogue to be held in New Delhi on Tuesday, October 27, is largely because there is a chicken-and-egg situation about it. It is impossible to decide which of two things caused the other one – the mushrooming US-Indian military alliance, or the continuing downhill slide in the India-China relationship. 

Read Here | Asia Times

What Would The Trump And Biden Foreign Policy Teams Look Like And How Is China Affected?

US President Donald Trump has been reaching into his 2016 playbook to target China during his re-election campaign, playing up his administration’s combative approach to Beijing and portraying his opponent Joe Biden as “soft” on China.

Read Here | South China Morning Post

China Right To Be Concerned About Quad Alliance’s Bright Future, Analysts Say

After initially dismissing the strategic partnership between the US, Japan, India and Australia – known as the Quad – analysts say Beijing is growing more cautious about the informal, implicitly anti-China alliance.

Read Here | South China Morning Post

Here’s How The 2020 U.S. Elections Resemble Those of Fragile Democracies

In large part because of Trump’s attacks on the process, elections in the United States look more and more like those we have observed in less-than-democratic countries. These are the kinds of problems that trigger substantial international concern. They hurt public confidence in the U.S. election process and threaten to undermine the very legitimacy of the United States’ democracy.

Read Here | Foreign Policy

The Strange Saga Of Meng Wanzhou

Until she was detained by the Royal Canadian Mounted Police while transiting Vancouver International Airport, the world had not heard of Meng Wanzhou. Now everybody knows that Meng, 48, is the chief financial officer of Huawei and the daughter of Ren Zhengfei, chief executive officer and founder of China’s leading technology giant.

Read Here | Asia Times

Big Tech Reckoning

The COVID-19 pandemic has further highlighted the market power of large technology companies and the inadequacy of current digital governance and regulation. What should policymakers do to address Big Tech’s growing clout and build an equitable digital economy?

Read Here | Project Syndicate

Why The Muslim Middle East Supports China’s Xinjiang Crackdown

Much as peace in Palestine has become less important to the Arab Gulf states’ foreign relations, so too does the Middle East’s silence on Xinjiang suggest that today’s regional governments are willing to compromise on peripheral interests if it means ensuring core ones.

Read Here | The National Interest

The Overreach Of The China Hawks

Managing the relationship with Beijing is a long-term project that cannot succeed without domestic revitalisation, greater unity of national purpose, and a respect for global opinion. But above all, U.S. leaders have to take a much more realistic view of the United States’ relationship with China than is now common in Washington…

Read Here | Foreign Affairs

Trump And Biden Are Both Touting Foreign-Policy Failures As Achievements

With the world on fire from Thailand to Nigeria, there wasn’t much talk of international affairs in the final debate of the 2020 campaign—and when there was, both candidates defended flawed approaches to North Korea.

Read Here | Foreign Policy

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