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Archive for the category “China”

Xi Jinping Is Not Stalin

The Cold War lasted 40 years. For most of that period, victory was uncertain. For Washington to be successful in what may be an even longer contest, it must diagnose the severity of the threat precisely and calibrate efforts to contain and deter Beijing accordingly. False analogies from the Cold War hurt both of these efforts.

Read Here – Foreign Affairs

TikTok Is Inane. China’s Imperial Ambition Is Not.

TikTok is not just China’s revenge for the century of humiliation between the Opium Wars and Mao’s revolution. It is the opium — a digital fentanyl, to get our kids stoked for the coming Chinese imperium.

Read Here – BloombergOpinion

President Xi’s Long Game

Xi Jinping intends to be the Leader of the “Second Hundred” just as Mao Zedong is regarded as the Leader of the “First Hundred”. This means the world will be dealing with President Xi Jinping for some time. It is, therefore, important to get a proper measure of the person.

Read Here – The Indian Express

China’s Fiscal Dilemma

The Chinese government is likely to face a tricky economic policy choice in the second half of this year. If it loosens its fiscal stance, public finances will worsen significantly. But if it cuts expenditure to offset the pandemic-related revenue shortfall, growth will be lower, with dire consequences.

Read Here – Project Syndicate

The Cost Of Friendship With China

What are the costs and benefits of friendship with an easily offended China? Who would want to be a friend of China today? Can countries live without China’s friendship? Do they have a choice not to be friends with China? If the Chinese government is not a friend, what is that relationship? Can bilateral ties with the world’s second-largest economy be reduced strictly to trade and investment, minus the warmth of friendship?

Read Here – Asia Times

China Can Buy Influence, But It Can’t Buy Love

If it’s going to compete with the United States for superpower status, it will have to match America’s soft power… But China has a distinct disadvantage: It’s not as attractive as America. Few people around the world voluntarily listen to Chinese songs, watch Chinese television, use Chinese slang (or any Chinese words), or dress like the Chinese people they see on TV.

Read Here – Foreign Policy

“For Our Enemies, We Have Shotguns”: Explaining China’s New Assertiveness

By any measure, China’s recent foreign policy has displayed an astonishing level of assertiveness. That Beijing has shed its prior inhibitions in the midst of a devastating global health and economic crisis for which the Chinese leadership itself bears culpability, and a still-fragile economic situation in China itself makes it all the more remarkable.

Read Here – WarOnTheRocks

Beijing Enjoys Greater Legitimacy Than Any Western State

Most Americans think with its democracy, the United States has the best form of government. China, with its one-party dictatorial state, communist or otherwise, has the worst form. This is China’s Achilles’ heel and will spell the downfall of the Chinese Communist Party. In reality, from the Chinese people’s perspective and theirs alone, their government today enjoys greater legitimacy and popularity than any American or Western government with respect to their own citizens.

Read Here – South China Morning Post

China-Africa Trade Takes Big Hit From Coronavirus In First Half

Two-way trade between China and Africa fell 19.3 per cent in the first half of the year to US$82.37 billion as coronavirus ravaged economies and cut demand for commodities. China, one of the biggest importers of raw materials from Africa, including copper, cobalt and oil, cut its imports from the continent by 31 per cent while its exports to Africa fell by 8.3 per cent.

China’s Self-Defeating Nationalism

Although the main objective of Beijing’s nationalist push has been to build domestic support for the Chinese Communist Party (CCP), it has also stoked tensions with Washington, as each side tries to outdo the other in shifting blame and avoiding accountability for its handling of COVID-19.

Read Here – Foreign Affairs

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