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looking beyond borders

foreign policy and global economy

Archive for the category “China”

China’s Maritime Expansion Reflects A Curious Mix Of Ambition And Paranoia

China was an inward-looking, continental power when Mr Wu was born. It rose in part by turning to the sea. Seven of the world’s ten largest container ports are in China. Overseas, Chinese companies had by 2018 helped build or expand 42 ports in 34 countries, often as part of the Belt and Road Initiative, a global infrastructure scheme. Chinese operators own majority stakes in foreign ports from Abu Dhabi to Zeebrugge.

Read Here – The Economist

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Re-made In China

In reality, China’s longstanding suspicion of foreign influence has not prevented the government or the people from becoming remarkably adept at marshalling the flow of overseas cultural touchstones into the country’s borders, remoulding them into something that isn’t entirely Chinese, but is also totally different from its original form.

Read Here – Aeon

Hong Kong’s Protests Show the Biggest Challenge to China’s Rise Is At Home

The biggest challenges to the brittle present system in China don’t come from outsiders concocting destabilizing plots in an imaginary, inimical West, but from Chinese people themselves, which is precisely what the people of Hong Kong are, as Beijing itself has always insisted. Once they get a whiff of them, people everywhere, it turns out, like freedoms of speech and association and the right to fair and impartial justice, and having a more or less direct say in the choice of their leaders.

Read Here – World Politics Review

What’s On Chinese President Xi Jinping’s Agenda For First Official Visit To North Korea

Chinese President Xi Jinping’s maiden state visit to Pyongyang this week may signal an economic re-engagement with the hermit kingdom, according to Chinese state media. Ahead of the visit, Communist Party mouthpiece People’s Daily has suggested, via its social media account, that restoring bilateral economic relations would be on the agenda.

Read Here – South China Morning Post

The ‘Xi Doctrine’: Proclaiming And Rationalizing China’s Aggression

Empirical evidence of China’s aggression is increasingly common, from its attempt to dominate the South China Sea, the neo-imperialist effort to gain control of states through the Belt and Road Initiative, to its technological imperialism to control 5G and artificial intelligence technologies. What is rather less frequent are statements from high-level Chinese officials proclaiming the country’s intent to be aggressive and offering an attempted legitimising principle justifying that aggression.

Read Here – The National Interest

International Rules Are Not A Puppet In The Hands Of US Politicians

In the eyes of some US politicians, the world is a theatre of monodrama for America, while the international rules are just a puppet in their hands. In this monodrama, it is the United States that decides how the story goes. So, is there any justice in this world? How can the hard-won international rules be protected?

Read Here – People’s Daily

Are China’s Digital Companies Ready To Go Global?

To get a sense of how thoroughly the global digital economy is dominated by the US and China, look no further than a recent list of the world’s most valuable internet-based companies. Eleven of the top 20 are from the US; the remainder are based in China.

Read Here – Boston Consulting Group

 

Decades Of Being Wrong About China Should Teach Us Something

Today, as policy makers and commentators confidently assert that trade wars are easy to win or that hot wars with China are either impossible or inevitable, the experience of being proved wrong again and again should remind us that events will, more than likely, not turn out as predicted.

Read Here – The Atlantic

The Perfect Storm Confronting Xi Jinping

Whether it was confidence due to his growing domestic strength, a belief that the balance of economic power in the U.S.-China relationship had already shifted, or a concern about appearing weak in front of Trump, Xi seems to have reached the conclusion that China, under his leadership, can successfully challenge the United States. This appears to have been a dangerous miscalculation. Xi may soon find that a perfect storm of agricultural problems, internal unhappiness, and his own chosen hard line on the trade war could undermine the domestic power he has worked so hard to consolidate.

Read Here – WarOnTheRocks

China Draws National Security Red Lines In Its Trade War With The United States

China’s national security issues – from Taiwan to the South China Sea and food security – will be at stake as the United States expands the trade war, according to some of Beijing’s most experienced US hands. Beijing has long claimed that national interests were at the heart of its main differences with Washington in the trade talks but it had not specified them publicly.

Read Here – South China Morning Post

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