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looking beyond borders

foreign policy and global economy

Archive for the category “China”

China’s Economic Black Box

The accuracy of China’s official growth statistics is once again in question. Last week, at the annual “two sessions” conference, Premier Li Keqiang announced that China would reduce its 2019 target for GDP growth to between 6 and 6.5 percent—previously, it was “around 6.5 percent.” That same week, a group of Chinese economists published a paper with the Brookings Institution concluding that China’s official nominal growth rates from 2008 to 2016 were being overstated by as much as 1.7 percent.

Read Here – Foreign Policy

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The Relationship Between The Size of China’s Economy And Its Military Posture

There is no question at this point that the relative sizes of the U.S. and Chinese economy today are much closer than those of Japan and the U.S. in the interwar period. And long story short, underselling the size of the Chinese defense budget and overselling the size of the Chinese economy does tend to obscure the magnitude of China’s defense buildup.

Read Here – The Diplomat

The Truth About The US-China Clash Of Civilisations? There Isn’t One

The current media-designated “war” between the, investment and technology has, unsurprisingly, revived a previously dormant discourse on differences between “Asian” (here, “Chinese”) vs “Western” (“American”) values that many believe portend the “clash of civilisations” advanced by Harvard political scientist Samuel Huntington in 1993, and repeatedly embellished by numerous acolytes since.

Read Here – South China Morning Post

China Walks Fine Line As India Calls On United Nations To Impose Anti-Terrorist Sanctions On Pakistani Militant Leader

A senior Chinese diplomat said China and Pakistan will defend their core interests as India called on Beijing and the other four permanent members of the UN Security Council to place a Pakistani militant leader on a counterterrorist sanctions list. Deputy foreign minister Kong Xuanyou stated China’s position at meetings with Pakistani Prime Minister Imran Khan, army chief General Qamar Javed Bajwa and Foreign Minister Shah Mehmood Qureshi in Islamabad…

Read Here – South China Morning Post

The Problem With Xi’s China Model

As Xi begins his second five-year term as CCP general secretary and (soon) president, there are signs that the new model’s very successes are becoming liabilities. Too much party control is contributing to a stagnant economy and societal discontent, while too much ambition has cooled the initial ardor with which many in the international community greeted Xi’s vision of a new global order “with Chinese characteristics.”

Read Here – Foreign Affairs

China Vows To Upgrade Country’s Manufacturing; No Mention Of Made In China 2025 For First Time In Three Years

In delivering his 2019 government work report to the National People’s Congress in Beijing, Chinese Premier Li Keqiang said the country would “work faster to make China strong in manufacturing” – this despite there being no mention of “Made in China 2025” in the government work report for the first time in three years.

Read Here – South China Morning Post

China Says Last Year’s GDP Growth Was Worth More Than Australia’s Whole Economy

Shanghai, China – Photo courtesy: ADB/Flickr

China’s added GDP last year exceeded the value of Australia’s total output, the country’s statistics agency said as it sought to highlight the country’s economic resilience. In 2018, China’s economic growth rate slowed to the lowest level in 28 years – a fact that has fanned concerns about the country’s economic outlook.

Read Here – South China Morning Post

China’s Lawmakers Are Gearing Up For A New World Order As ‘Two Sessions’ Approach

As China battles a trade war and international suspicion, delegates at this year’s National People’s Congress can no longer concern themselves only with domestic issues, analysts say And as the 70th anniversary of Communist Party rule draws ever nearer, the last thing Beijing needs is more disruption.

Read Here – South China Morning Post

The Island That Changed History

There was once an uninhabited islet lying close to the Chinese side of the Ussuri River, which marks the border between Russia and China in the Far East. “Was,” because it has since attached itself to the Chinese bank in a defiant act of geographic irony. But during the turbulent spring of 1969 this little islet — called Damansky in Russian and Zhenbao Dao in Chinese — was the stage for a game-changing encounter.

Read Here – The New York Times

Misreading China’s Strength

With the Chinese economy slowing, the US believes that China is hurting and desperate for a deal to end the bilateral trade war before it resumes after March 1, when the current 90-day truce expires. But the two economies’ longer-term fundamentals compel a very different verdict on relative strength.

Read Here – Project Syndicate

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