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looking beyond borders

foreign policy and global economy

Archive for the category “Global Economy”

The Demise Of Dollar Diplomacy?

Pundits have been saying last rites for the dollar’s global dominance since the 1960s – that is, for more than half a century now. But the pundits may finally be right, because the greenback’s dominance has been sustained by geopolitical alliances that are now fraying badly.

Read Here – Project Syndicate

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Could It All Be Made In China By 2025?

Take more than 500 types of industrial product and China ranks first for 220 of them, globally. Yet Beijing isn’t satisfied with just being the world’s factory for cheap goods. More than a third of the country’s 800-million workforce produce biblical amounts of stuff, generating $3 trillion annually, but China’s position is slipping. It’s political and economic leaders know the country can’t rest on its laurels for long. There are more than a few rivals nipping at its heels, but it has a plan.

Read Here – Raconteur

Five Trade Issues The US And China Need To Tackle Before Trump Goes To Beijing

A number of concerns – ranging from exchange rates to accusations of intellectual property theft – are likely to feature prominently when Donald Trump visits Beijing later this year.

Read Here – South China Morning Post

Yes, Nations Can Spend Their Way Out of Recessions. Sometimes.

The case for government spending during economic slowdowns has been hotly debated for decades. John Maynard Keynes went as far as to suggest that during a recession governments should pay people to do meaningless tasks — such as digging holes in the ground and then filling them up.

Read Here – BloombergView

Even With Modi Back On Board, China Will Find It Hard To Keep Emerging Markets Club Together

The confirmation that Indian Prime Minister Narendra Modi will show up in the coastal city of Xiamen has cleared a major obstacle to a “successful” BRICS leader summit – an event that China has been preparing for months to showcase its global influence. However, a ceremonial summit may not heal deep cracks in the club of Brazil, Russia, India, China and South Africa.

Read Here – South China Morning Post

Also Read: Five Things To Watch Out For At The BRICS Nations Summit

An Economic Fallout Is Coming From All The Asian Military Standoffs

The stakes are high for the U.S. as tensions in Asia ramp up. The country has $1.3 trillion of two-way trade with the region, based on annualised data in the first six months of this year. That’s 52.5 percent of America’s total foreign trade. But that is only part of U.S. linkage with Asian economies. Fixed-asset investments generating those trade flows have also to be taken into account as they directly affect employment and income levels in about one-third of American aggregate demand.

Read Here – CNBC

The Guardian Of The Liberal World Order

The global financial crisis, which began ten years ago this month, showed that the Western-led rules-based international order’s long-term survival is not inevitable. It is often assumed that if and when the United States loses its place as the global hegemon in that system, China will be the country to lead the world. But what would a Chinese-led order look like?

Read Here – Project-Syndicate

Extraordinary Measures For Ordinary Times

The legacy of 2007 is still with us. Its most devastating and destructive effect was to put a premium on unconventional monetary measures. Unfortunately, when policymakers scrambled in search of “big bazookas” ten years ago, they set the stage for the return of an old character: a strongman willing to pull the trigger.

Read Here – Project-Syndicate

OPEC’s Game-Theory Dilemma

To win the price-setting game, oil producers need to address two related issues: They must maintain prices at a relatively high level without losing more market share to nontraditional producers, and they need to retain unity amid geopolitical tensions and disparities in domestic economic and financial situations.

Read Here – BloombergView

Explaining Global Recovery Amid Political Recession

Today, the world’s major economies are experiencing a steady recovery, despite the occasional setback. To be sure, economic performance is far from reaching its full potential: depending on where one looks, one can find output gaps, excess leverage, fragile balance sheets, under-investment, and unfunded longer-term non-debt liabilities. Still, financial markets show no signs of convulsion, even as monetary stimulus is gradually withdrawn.

Read Here – Project Syndicate

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