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looking beyond borders

foreign policy and global economy

Archive for the category “Global Economy”

Emerging Markets Aren’t Out Of The Woods Yet

How should emerging-market governments deal with the new original sin? One way would be to develop a large domestic institutional investor base that sets its objectives in domestic currency terms and is thus insulated from exchange-rate swings. National pension systems contribute to this goal, and many emerging-market countries, such as Chile and Mexico, have made solid progress in this direction.

Read Here – Foreign Affairs

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The Geopolitical Implications Of The Global Energy Transition

If for more than half a century oil and natural gas have been at the heart of the geopolitics of energy, it is sensible to investigate if and how this will change as a result of the global energy transition, a process driven by decarbonisation policies and by quick developments in renewable energy technologies and electric cars.

Read Here – Bruegel

Cautious Optimism In Beijing For US-China Trade Deal

China’s senior diplomat Wang Yi said the latest round of trade talks with the US had provided “positive prospects” on Sino-American ties and the global economy, as state media reacted with cautious optimism. The talks between chief negotiators in Washington, described by Wang at a Beijing event as “achieving concrete progress”, yielded an immediate delay to US President Donald Trump’s planned extra tariffs on Chinese imports.

Read Here – South China Morning Post

Also Read: Liu He, China’s man on the front lines of the trade war talks with the United States

A Mixed Economic Bag In 2019

7Since the global synchronised growth of 201, economic conditions have been gradually weakening and will produce an across-the-board deceleration in the months ahead. Beyond that, the prospect for markets and national economies will depend on a broad range of factors, some of which do not bode well.

Read Here – Project Syndicate

The End Of Economics?

In the three decades since the end of the Cold War, economics has enjoyed a kind of intellectual hegemony. In the three decades since the end of the Cold War, economics has enjoyed a kind of intellectual hegemony. It has become first among equals in the social sciences and has dominated most policy agendas as well. Economists have been much sought after by businesses, governments, and society at large, their insights seen as useful in every sphere of life…That hegemony is now over.

Read Here – Foreign Policy

Arrested Diplomacy

The Japanese and Canadian governments have failed to manage effectively the reputational, economic, and geopolitical implications of the legal cases against Nissan chairman Carlos Ghosn and Huawei CFO Meng Wanzhou. And, in a globalized world, the risks posed by such cases are likely to grow.

Read Here – Project Syndicate

The Rise Of Populism Shows We Are Increasingly In A ‘Geopolitical Recession’

Financial markets must start to account for the personalities of populist world leaders, according to veteran investment banker and philanthropist John Studzinski. His comments come at a time when market participants are increasingly concerned about a serious economic slowdown, with a long-running global trade war souring business and consumer sentiment.

Read Here – CNBC

The World Economy Goes Hollywood

In the film industry, the richest and most experienced studios and producers spend vast amounts of time and money on audience research, but still have no idea if their latest creations will turn out to be hits or flops. So why be surprised if the same is true of financial markets – or, for that matter, of commodity prices, policymaking, and corporate performance?

Read Here – Project Syndicate

The ‘Age of Tech’ Is Over

On September 28, 2018, tech died. That’s according to a widely circulated eulogy prepared by Vincent Deluard, a strategist at INTL FCStone, a financial services company. “If technology is everywhere, the tech sector no longer exists,” he wrote. “If the tech sector no longer exists, its premium is no longer justified.”

Read Here – The Atlantic

The Euro Turns 20

The euro’s first 20 years played out very differently than many expected, highlighting the importance of recognizing that the future is likely to be different from the past. Given this, only a commitment to flexibility and a willingness to rise to new challenges will ensure the common currency’s continued success.

Read Here – Project Syndicate

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