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Archive for the category “India”

India’s Role In The Great-Power Struggle Over The Indo-Pacific Region

India’s foreign policy is being shaped into a new contour, right from Act East to Neighbourhood First, there is a new outlook for the traditionally globally reticent aspiring superpower India. But traditional international relations theorists have lamented that India with its growing economy and global diaspora will be a great presence more than a great power.

Read Here – The National Interest

Anticipating Pakistan’s Next Move In Kashmir

Pakistanis often call Kashmir their “jugular vein.” The implication is that reclaiming the part of the region now administered by India is key to Pakistan’s survival. That objective got harder in August 2019, when India rescinded Kashmir’s semi-autonomous status. The move caught Pakistan off guard, made its military look weak, and turned its goal of annexing territory that has never formed part of its homeland even more distant. How has Pakistan responded to India annulling Kashmir’s special status? And how will Pakistan try to advance its position in Kashmir going forward?

Read Here – WarOnTheRocks

A New, Fractured Global Order Is Upon Us

It is increasingly clear to communities and countries that the distribution of agency in the international system is inequitable and no longer reflects contemporary realities. It is this anger and disappointment, directed against globalisation, that has powered the rise of these strongmen and women.

Read Here – The Indian Express

What Happened To India?

The India the world once celebrated – the world’s fastest-growing free-market liberal democracy – seems to be giving way to a violent, intolerant, illiberal autocracy. It is a turn that was long in the making, reflecting the impact of eight major factors on the country’s society and politics.

Read Here – Project Syndicate

Also Read: Is India Still A Democracy?

India’s Grand Strategy Needs A Second Act

…India is facing a chasm between its global aspirations and the reality of its national power. A confluence of disruptive factors has now made the business-as-usual approach simply unsustainable. A course correction if not undertaken and executed sensibly could imperil India’s rise for the next generation.

Read Here – Economic & Political Weekly

When Politics Hurts Diplomacy

In his speech at a rally in Delhi on Sunday, Prime Minister Narendra Modi referred to India’s expanding friendships in the Middle East during the last few years. The PM, however, might be in the danger of squandering a major diplomatic achievement, if he miscalculates the external costs of the government’s domestic politics. Worse still, Delhi might be giving an opportunity to an otherwise divided world, Muslim and non-Muslim alike, to agree in their disapproval of India’s domestic    politics.

Read Here – The Indian Express

The End Of Gandhi’s India?

This year, as the world marked the 150th anniversary of Mahatma Gandhi’s birth, Indian voters repudiated his legacy by re-electing Prime Minister Narendra Modi. By doubling down on Islamophobia and Hindu nationalism, Modi and his party has rejected Gandhi’s vision of interfaith harmony and political pluralism.

Read Here – Project Syndicate

India’s New Security Order

How should observers assess India’s new security order? And what implications, if any, does it have for the United States? There are three characteristics of the new order: an emphasis on risk-taking and assertiveness, the fusing of domestic and international politics, and the use of unrelenting spin to hold critics at bay. This approach carries potential benefits for the United States in bolstering its position in Asia. But it also brings a set of risks and challenges that demand clear-eyed analysis — and a willingness to debate how the United States engages with India moving forward.

Read Here – WarOnTheRocks

With Growth This Bad, India Needs More Than Luck

With India’s growth tumbling to 4.5% from 8.1% in little more than a year, you’d be surprised to know that Shaktikanta Das has one of the easiest jobs in central banking. He just has to keep doing what he’s been doing since becoming governor of the Reserve Bank of India last December: cut interest rates. Fortunately, political will is on his side.

Read Here – BloombergView

Nehru And His Articles On India

Former Indian Prime Minister Jawaharlal Nehru penned two articles for Foreign Affairs, one in 1938 and another in 1963, which provide an interesting perspective into what India was, wanted to be, and has been. Read:

The Unity of India – Foreign Affairs, 1938

Changing India – Foreign Affairs, 1963

 

 

 

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