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foreign policy and global economy

Archive for the category “Internet”

Three Challenges For The Web, According To Its Inventor

I imagined the web as an open platform that would allow everyone, everywhere to share information, access opportunities and collaborate across geographic and cultural boundaries. In many ways, the web has lived up to this vision, though it has been a recurring battle to keep it open. But over the past 12 months, I’ve become increasingly worried about three new trends, which I believe we must tackle in order for the web to fulfil its true potential as a tool which serves all of humanity, writes web inventor Sir Tim Berners-Lee.

Read Here – World Wide Web Foundation

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The Soviet Web: The Tale Of How The USSR Almost Invented The internet

When brilliant Soviet cyberneticist Viktor Glushkov designed a blueprint for a computerised planning system, the Soviet Union looked on track to become web pioneers. In the end, however, there was to be no digital network.

Read Here – The Calvert Journal

Raiders Of The Lost Web

The web, as it appears at any one moment, is a phantasmagoria. It’s not a place in any reliable sense of the word. It is not a repository. It is not a library. It is a constantly changing patchwork of perpetual nowness. You can’t count on the web, okay? It’s unstable. You have to know this.

Read Here – The Atlantic

A Dangerous Game: Responding To Chinese Cyber Activities

Is it necessary for the United States to find a way to deal with Chinese criminal activity in cyberspace? Absolutely. But, this is a very dangerous game. It is important that the United States have no illusions about what it is getting itself into. Some have suggested that punishing China for its unwillingness to adhere to international norms will encourage China to get in line and follow the rules. Considering Chinese culture and past Chinese reactions, this is highly unlikely.

Read Here – The Diplomat

The Middle East’s Internet Revolution

A silent revolution is taking place in the Middle East. In 2000, there were about 460,000 Internet users in Egypt; by the end of 2014 there were over 46 million, more than half of the Egyptian population. The same trend is true for most countries in the Middle East and North Africa where Internet penetration reaches an average of 20% per year. On average, these countries have reached a level where roughly 50% of its populations have Internet access (a higher average than globally, which is 42.3%).

Read Here – Al Monitor

War On Internet Security

The Five Eyes alliance — the secret services of Britain, Canada, Australia, New Zealand and the United States — pursue a clear goal: removing the encryption of others on the Internet wherever possible. In 2013, the NSA had a budget of more than $10 billion. According to the US intelligence budget for 2013, the money allocated for the NSA department called Cryptanalysis and Exploitation Services (CES) alone was $34.3 million.

Read Here – Der Spiegel

Towards Digital Well Being

Tripling mobile Internet access over the next 15 years could make the developing world $22 trillion richer. Such improvement in the lives and earning potential of poor people could indirectly help with the other challenges; after all, more prosperous people tend to be healthier, better fed, and more highly educated.

Read Here – Project Syndicate

So What’s Trending?

The digital revolution has profoundly impacted nearly every aspect of our lives.  Despite the enormity of these changes, the Internet continues to grow and develop. Three trends are transforming the Net and challenging the digital infrastructure that supports it.

Read Here – Brookings

U.S. To Let Go Of Control Over Internet Domain Names

Several times in the last decade, a group of countries has urged that control of domain names be transferred to the United Nations. All you need to know about this movement is that it is led by China and Russia. In the very dull, very important meetings of the International Telecommunications Union, speeches by these countries feature the word “sovereignty.”

Read Here – Businessweek

Believe It Or Not: Over 60% Of Internet Traffic Doesn’t Come From Humans

This non-human traffic is search bots, scrapers, hacking tools, and other human impersonators, little pieces of code skittering across the web. You might describe this phenomenon as The Internet of Thingies.

Read Here – Quartz

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