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looking beyond borders

foreign policy and global economy

Archive for the category “Middle East”

Why Is China So Worried About Trump Recognising Jerusalem As Israel’s Capital?

China anticipates more conflict in the Middle East following the United States’ move to recognise Jerusalem as Israel’s capital, which in turn would disrupt its investment plans in the region, diplomatic observers said.

Read Here – South China Morning Post

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Trump Recognises Jerusalem As Israeli Capital In U.S. Shift

President Donald Trump on Wednesday recognised Jerusalem as Israel’s capital and announced he would begin moving the U.S. embassy there, despite warnings from leaders across the globe that the move would undermine peace efforts and spark violence.

Read Here – Bloomberg

Also Read: A Guide to the Dispute Over Jerusalem and Israel’s Capital

GCC Summit Cut Short By A Day Amid Diplomatic Rift

A key regional summit of the six-nation Gulf Cooperation Council (GCC) countries has been cut short and will conclude on Tuesday instead of Wednesday, with all the delegates leaving Kuwait after a closed session. The Kuwait summit takes place exactly six months after three of the member states severed diplomatic and trade ties with Qatar.

Read Here – Al Jazeera

Also Read: UAE and Saudis form new partnership separate from GCC

Will The GCC Summit Resolve The Ongoing Crisis?

It remains unclear whether the upcoming Gulf Cooperation Council summit in Kuwait will have any positive effect on the ongoing fractures between Qatar and a number of Gulf states, analysts say, as the regional body gears into a symbolic rather than functional role.

Read Here – Al Jazeera

Also Read: What Is The GCC

Iran’s Chabahar Port Promise And The Nuclear Deal Threat

Iran has launched one of its major post-nuclear deal projects – the port of Chabahar – pushing further for engagement with the global community, days before the US Congress’ expected decision on whether Washington will pull out of the landmark international accord.

Read Here – Al Jazeera

How Obama And Trump Left A Vacuum In The Middle East

Once upon a time, all the experts said that America was the guarantor of security in the Middle East. To the extent that it’s still true, it’s not at all what you’re thinking. Actually, it’s probably the exact opposite of what you’re thinking. Israel Defense Forces chief Lieutenant General Gadi Eisenkot gave an unprecedented interview last week to the Saudi media. In a hold-the-presses moment, Eisenkot disclosed that Israel was ready to share sensitive intelligence with moderate Arab countries for the purpose of countering Iran. He credited President Donald Trump with creating an opportunity for a new alliance in the region.

Read Here – Politico

Tehran Is Winning The War For Control Of The Middle East

Saudi Arabia appears to be on a warpath across the Middle East. The Saudi-orchestrated resignation of Lebanese Prime Minister Saad Hariri, and Saudi officials’ bellicose rhetoric after the launch of a ballistic missile targeting Riyadh from Yemen, appear to herald a new period of assertiveness against Iranian interests across the Middle East.

Read Here – Foreign Policy

What is behind the covert Israeli-Saudi relations?

Israel and Saudi Arabia may seem unlikely allies in regional politics but recent developments have pushed Riyadh and Tel Aviv closer together, setting the stage for the Middle East’s strangest bedfellows. The covert ties between Israel and Saudi Arabia, based on an alliance against the “common threat” of Iran, are part of a new regional paradigm, analysts say.

Read Here – Al Jazeera

New Winds In Saudi Arabia

It is true that Saudi Arabia stoked the Sunni-Shia conflict in the region after the 1979 Soviet invasion of Afghanistan, but the jurisprudence of the intra-Islam war of the sects was dug up from the Saudi past and its embrace of Wahhabism in the 18th century. If it gives up extremism in 2017, it will have to say goodbye to all that Wahhabism has entailed.

Read Here – The Indian Express

Meet The Next Generation Of Saudi Rulers

Since April, Mohammed bin Salman, now 32, has been quietly orchestrating the appointments of a range of young princes in their late twenties or thirties to positions of power. They will likely be crucial to the success of his remodeling of the kingdom and could emerge as arbiters of power for decades to come. They are all either the grandsons or great grandsons of the kingdom’s founder, Ibn Saud, who died in 1953. Mohammed bin Salman is entirely prudent in promoting these younger cousins, appealing to their ambition and vanity, and securing their loyalty.

Read Here – Foreign Policy

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