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Archive for the category “Pakistan”

Biden Needs A New Pakistan Policy. This Is What It Should Look Like

For the first time in over two decades, Pakistan is not a foreign-policy priority for a new US administration… This new reality raises the important question of how the United States should think about its relationship with Pakistan. A country of more than 200 million people, Pakistan is geo-strategically located at the mouth of the Persian Gulf and borders Iran, India, and China. It is critical to the stability of its neighbourhood and an important accessway into Central Asia.

Read Here | The Atlantic Council

China’s Pakistan Investments A Double-Edged Sword

As rising Chinese investment promises to boost Pakistan’s ailing economy in an hour of need, there are concurrent nationalistic concerns expressed by local businesses and groups that Chinese investors are cornering key local industries, state assets and businesses to the detriment of Pakistani players and interests.

Read Here | Asia Times

China Slowly Retreating From Pakistan’s Belt And Road

Pakistan’s army is set to take near-total control of the Beijing-financed China-Pakistan Economic Corridor (CPEC), a US$60 billion infrastructure building plan replete with railways, roads, ports and special economic zones (SEZs) that is key to China’s global Belt and Road Initiative (BRI).  

Read Here | Asia Times

Will Pakistan’s Military Lose Its Grip On Power?

Many Pakistanis see the army as the real power behind Khan and the cause of the country’s political and economic woes. Their anger has occasioned a remarkable shift as major political figures speak out for the first time against the military’s dominance of Pakistan—a shift that could eventually threaten the military’s chokehold on political power.

Read Here | Foreign Affairs

The Military Seeds Of Pakistan’s Discontent

When General Pervez Musharraf stepped down as Pakistan’s president in 2008, many had hoped the nation’s coup-riddled politics were headed in a decidedly more democratic direction. Fast forward to the present, Pakistan has moved from a brief period as a functional electoral democracy to Prime Minister Imran Khan’s “hybrid” regime, where elected and military officials share political and economic power.

Read Here | Asia Times

What Biden Will And Won’t Do For Pakistan

The transition from US President Donald Trump to Joe Biden inspires equal measures of hope and fear in Pakistan given the president-elect’s expressed views on rights, equality and democracy. Analysts say Pakistan’s ability to balance ties with the US and China amid growing friction between the two superpowers will also set the tone for the US policy toward Pakistan under Biden.

Read Here | Asia Times

Nawaz Sharif Checkmates Pakistani Establishment

Gradually the PTI (Pakistan Tehreek-e-Insaf) government is losing its grip on power, as the political opposition not only has pushed it on to the back foot but has also weakened the military establishment’s control of the power chessboard. On Sunday, the Pakistan Democratic Movement (PDM), and alliance of opposition parties, held its third massive public gathering, this time in Quetta, the capital of Balochistan province.

Read Here | Asia Times

Sharif Breaks The Chains Of Fear

This speech of Sharif’s has raised the temperature of the politics of Pakistan and now it is the government of Imran Khan, General Bajwa and General Faiz that is feeling the heat. A defiant Sharif ready to lock horns with the current leadership of the establishment was the last thing Khan would have wanted, as his survival is dependent on Bajwa and Faiz.

Read Here | Asia Times

China-Pakistan Economic Corridor: Debt-Trap Or Game Changer?

The China-Pakistan Economic Corridor, or CPEC, has been the focus of heated debate among observers of Asia — and, in particular, South Asia — since its announcement in 2013. Proponents of the project in China and Pakistan describe CPEC as a “gamechanger” that will uplift Pakistan and adjacent areas of China and perhaps even reshape the economic geography of the region.

Raed Here | CEPC Wire

Diverging Interests Changing Saudi-Pakistani Relationship

The longstanding strategic relationship between Pakistan and Saudi Arabia is facing daunting challenges. Given their close historic relationship, Riyadh and Islamabad are unlikely to experience a serious breakdown in bilateral ties. However, geostrategic shifts and changing foreign policy priorities will continue to place Riyadh and Islamabad at odds with each other, despite their subjective preferences to the contrary.

Read Here | Centre For Global Policy

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