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Archive for the category “Pakistan”

Pakistan Pays Price For Failed Doctrine

The hybrid regime ruling Pakistan – a political party backed by the military establishment – has been doing everything to suppress the opposition and dissenting voices in the press but has failed miserably to change the economic fortunes of the country or to bring normalcy to the political discourse.

Read Here – Asia Times

Is Pakistan Nothing More than A Colony Of China?

Pakistanis may soon die en masse for China’s interests, and the Pakistani government may allow it to happen. At issue is the nature of how Pakistan’s leaders have shifted their alliance partners from the United States to China. That the U.S.-Pakistan relationship has plummeted in recent years should not surprise. Pakistan was long an American Cold War ally but it was a partnership of last resort for both countries.

Read Here – The National Interest

Pakistan’s Hybrid Regime Buying Time Before Its Downfall

Gradually the invisible government of the establishment is becoming visible, as the bad governance of the Khan-led PTI government and its inability to bring the opposition parties to the table for a cohesive national action plan for fighting the Covid-19 pandemic and its impact on country’s economy has left the establishment with virtually no option but to come to center stage and govern from the front.

Read Here – Asia Times

 

Pakistan’s Massive March Calls Out Military Overreach

Pakistan’s powerful military is struggling to keep its grip on power as the country seethes with anger over the rising cost of living caused by sluggish economic growth, political victimisation, narrowing space for freedom of expression, and the militarisation of politics.

Read Here – The Diplomat

 

The Regime

Just because Imran is flailing around doesn’t automatically have to mean that a better frontman can never be unearthed. It could just be a question of more skilfully looking in the right place at the right time. A regime frontman with the skills of a technocrat, the savvy of a traditional politician and the sleight of hand of a populist. See the problem there? In Pakistan? You may as well be looking for a unicorn snuggling up to leprechaun at the end of a rainbow.

Read Here – Dawn

How Imran Khan Is Remaking Pakistan

After a hard-partying life as a cricket star and sex symbol, Pakistan’s prime minister has transformed himself from revered sportsman into international statesman. Now, as he seeks to navigate the crisis over Kashmir, Khan remains torn between his years as an Oxford-educated playboy and his growing role as a critic of Western decadence.

Read Here – Vanity Fair

Pakistan Army Chief Gen Bajwa’s Tenure Extended For Another 3 Years

Prime Minister Imran Khan has approved an extension in the tenure of Army Chief Gen Qamar Javed Bajwa for another three years, a statement issued by the premier’s office said on Monday. The announcement comes nearly three months before Gen Bajwa was due to retire.

Read Here – Dawn

How China Can Offer Pakistan A Path From The Precipice

Introduced under considerable fanfare in 2015, CPEC provides much-needed financing for infrastructure and energy pipelines that Pakistan could not entice other investors to underwrite. However, the expected payoff is unlikely to compensate for the sizable risks to which these investments expose the Pakistani economy.

Read Here – RealClearWorld

Imran Khan—Sport, Power, Women

Imran probably first came to the attention of the non-cricket-playing world in May 2005 as a result of a Newsweek article claiming that U.S. interrogators had desecrated copies of the Koran while questioning prisoners at Guantanamo Bay… Imran lost little time in calling a press conference in Islamabad, in which, flourishing a copy of the magazine, he called the incident “a disgrace” and “an insult to Muslims,” who were now “themselves under attack from the West.” At least seventeen people were killed and up to six hundred injured when demonstrators then took to the streets of Pakistan to shout anti-U.S. slogans and burn the American flag. It took five days for the disturbances to be brought under control.

Read Here – Modern Age

Why A Warmer US-Pakistan Relationship Is A Win For China

On the whole, Beijing benefits from better relations between Islamabad and Washington. Chinese officials have regularly counselled their Pakistani counterparts to preserve ties with the US, even in the aftermath of the Osama bin Laden raid, which humiliated Pakistan. Deep mutual trust underpins the China-Pakistan relationship, so renewed communication between Islamabad and Washington is unlikely to make Beijing anxious – although China’s hand has been strengthened by their strained relations in the past.

Read Here – South China Morning Post

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