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looking beyond borders

foreign policy and global economy

Archive for the category “Politics”

Why the New Autocrats Are Weaker Than They Look

It has been a good decade for dictatorship. The global influence of the world’s most powerful authoritarian countries, China and Russia, has grown rapidly. For the first time since the late nineteenth century, the cumulative GDP of autocracies now equals or exceeds that of Western liberal democracies.

Read Here – Foreign Affairs

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The Coming Automation Of Propaganda

This emerging threat draws its power from vulnerabilities in our society: an unaware public, an underprepared legal system, and social media companies not sufficiently concerned with their exploitability by malign actors. Addressing these vulnerabilities requires immediate attention from lawmakers to inform the public, address legal blind spots, and hold social media companies to account.

Read Here – WarOnTheRocks

The Twin Rise Of Populism And Authoritarianism

Globally, the past decade has been marked by the twin advances of authoritarianism and populism. The two are not always linked, but in situations ranging from the Philippines and Cambodia to Hungary and Poland, politicians have leveraged populist movements to seize power.

Read Here – World Politics Review

Springtime For Nationalism?

Is populism still on the rise? That question will be looming over elections in Israel, India, Indonesia, the Philippines, Spain, and the European Union over the next two months. Yet it will be misplaced, for the real contest is between nationalism and internationalism.

Read Here – Project Syndicate

A Better Populism

The only policy that left- and right-wing populists can agree on to address economic decline is trade protectionism, which will make the world poorer. A new type of populism that puts more trust in local communities may well have a greater chance of success.

Read Here – Project Syndicate

Populism’s Common Denominator

What unites supporters of authoritarian, upstart politicians like US President Donald Trump and Brazilian President-elect Jair Bolsonaro is revulsion against the corruption of the political process. But voters will learn the hard way that strongman rule exacerbates rather than mitigates corruption.

Read Here – Project Syndicate

This Is How We Radicalised The World

Populist leaders and the legions of influencers riding their wave know they can create filter bubbles inside of platforms like Facebook or YouTube that promise a safer time, one that never existed in the first place, before the protests, the violence, the cascading crises, and endless news cycles.

Read Here – BuzzFeed

Many Around the World Are Disengaged From Politics

An engaged citizenry is often considered a sign of a healthy democracy. High levels of political and civic participation increase the likelihood that the voices of ordinary citizens will be heard in important debates, and they confer a degree of legitimacy on democratic institutions. However, in many nations around the world, much of the public is disengaged from politics.

Read Here – Pew Research

China’s Xi Jinping And Russia’s Vladimir Putin Are Putting Strongman Politics Back On The Map

Strongman politics is back. And for anyone who thought otherwise, a quick peruse of this weekend’s headlines should help set them straight. In Beijing, Chinese President Xi Jinping received a thunderous ovation at the Great Hall of the People as he was sworn in for a second term, just minutes after receiving a unanimous mandate to do so and less than a week after lawmakers voted to revise the constitution and remove the two-term limit. In Moscow, Vladimir Putin became Russian president for the fourth time.

Read Here – South China Morning Post

What Does Mark Zuckerberg’s Pledge Of Fixing Facebook’s Issues Mean For The Fate Of News On The Platform?

The question had been raised before: What if Facebook, struggling with the global “fake news” problem, just threw up its Like hands and de-prioritised news altogether? In the dawn of 2018, it doesn’t seem as far fetched anymore. Mark Zuckerberg’s goal for the new year (joining previous annual goals of visiting all 50 U.S. states, running 365 miles in a year, and building an AI system for his home) is now focusing on fixing Facebook’s issues of abuse, hate, foreign interference, and mindless scrolling (maybe). But how does “fixing” affect the distribution of legitimate news?

Read Here – NiemanLab

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