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Archive for the category “South Asia”

China In Sri Lanka: The Colombo Port Conundrum

Since the return of the Rajapaksa brothers to office as president and prime minister in Sri Lanka, Colombo’s relations with China have improved dramatically. Earlier in the week, the Sri Lankan Parliament decided to postpone a debate on the controversial Colombo Port City Economic Commission Bill that was scheduled for the middle of the week. 

Read Here | The Diplomat

The Economics Of The China-India-Sri Lanka Triangle

Sri Lanka’s relationship with China has been a controversial discussion during the last decade, dominating both domestic and international political conversations… Yet it is quite clear that Sri  Lanka’s closest neighbor, India, and the United States are diligently monitoring these developments in the China-Sri Lanka relationship.

Read Here | The Diplomat

How the Cold War Shaped Bangladesh’s Liberation War

One factor that begs the attention of many is the United States’ role during Bangladesh’s war of independence in 1971. Why did the United States choose to look away while its ally was involved in systematic massacres? Blood’s memoir and Bass’s investigative reporting seek to answer that question and, in so doing, highlight how the Cold War’s great powers had a lot at stake in Bangladesh’s Liberation War.

Read Here | The Diplomat

Rein In Rajapaksas Before It’s Too Late

Sri Lanka has a long history of insurgencies and terrorist attacks in reaction to the political marginalisation of minorities and the state’s violations of their rights. Against this backdrop, the Human Rights Council should in the present session go beyond the focus on accountability in past resolutions to sound the alarm about the rising risks of future abuses and their potential link to violent conflict…

Read Here | Asia Times

War Is Over Between India And Pakistan—For Now

After a couple of years in which Indian-Pakistan relations have taken a nosedive over a series of bloody border clashes, the two sides have agreed to strike another deal. Both will hold their fire and continue negotiations to end the long-simmering conflict between them. There is reason for optimism; even a fragile peace is better than continued conflict.

Read Here | Foreign Policy

South Asia Must Deal With Changed Realities In Middle East

The geopolitical turbulence in the Middle East has major consequences for the sub-continent, which has intimate religious, strategic and economic tie with the region. Whether they want to or not, India, Pakistan and Bangladesh must deal with three broad trends that define the new Middle East.

Read Here | The Indian Express

The Radicalisation Of Bangladeshi Cyberspace

There are fears that online rumours and misinformation could reignite a wave of extremism across Bangladesh. In fact, there are worrying signs that it is already starting. In early November, houses belonging to Bangladeshi Hindus were vandalized and torched after one of their occupants was accused of supporting France and defaming Islam on social media.

Read Here | Foreign Policy

Bangladesh Wins And Loses In China-India rivalry

Which of the two Asian giants has more sway in Dhaka these days is debatable. But with India distracted with a spiralling Covid-19 epidemic and with several unresolved bilateral sore points, China may have an upper hand, one it is now seeking to consolidate to its strategic advantage.

Read Here | Asia Times

COVID-19 Will Leave South Asia Poorer, Weaker And Less Democratic

South Asian economies had seen some of the world’s fastest growth in recent years, but there are also high concentrations of extreme poverty in the region. Poor or near-poor residents of India and Pakistan were already suffering from a series of regressive economic policies, so for them, the pandemic is the second of a one-two punch.

Read Here – World Politics Review

Coronavirus And The Threat To South Asian Democracy

Like the rest of the world, much of South Asia’s 1.89 billion population is now under lockdown to prevent the spread of the deadly coronavirus. While Western citizens can, for the most part, temporarily afford to follow preventive measures such as mandatory lockdown, social distancing, and self-isolation, these are tough options for millions of South Asia’s poor. Their tales of everyday struggle for food are well-documented.

Read Here – Lowy Institute

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