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Archive for the category “technology”

5G Was Going To Unite The World—Instead It’s Tearing Us Apart

The world came together to build 5G. Now the next-generation wireless technology is pulling the world apart. The latest version of the 5G technical specifications, expected Friday, adds features for connecting autonomous cars, intelligent factories, and internet-of-things devices to crazy fast 5G networks. The blueprints reflect a global effort to develop the technology, with contributions from more than a dozen companies from Europe, the US, and Asia. And yet, 5G is also pulling nations apart.

 

The Chip Wars Of The 21st Century

Controlling advanced chip manufacturing in the 21st century may well prove to be like controlling the oil supply in the 20th. The country that controls this manufacturing can throttle the military and economic power of others. The United States recently did this to China by limiting Huawei’s ability to outsource its in-house chip designs for manufacture by Taiwan Semiconductor Manufacturing Company (TSMC), a Taiwanese chip foundry.

Read Here – WarOnTheRocks

It’s Now Or Never For National Data Strategies

While the private sector is rushing ahead to amass as much data as it can, governments and public policymakers are only just beginning to grapple with the unique challenges posed by data-driven markets. As a critical resource that is unlike anything that came before it, big data demands a robust policy response.

Read Here – Project Syndicate

Governments Are Clamping Down On Foreign Tech Investments

State inspection of foreign investments at home isn’t novel. Probing NGOs and mandating registration of foreign lobbyists are just two decades-old examples. What’s different today is that countries are accelerating and expanding these powers where they already exist, or freshly architecting them altogether. It’s a way for governments to address two things: perceived foreign influence over their domestic technology spheres, and perceived risks of foreign governments using investments and acquisitions to access sensitive data.

Read Here – Wired

Too Big To Prevail

When executives at the biggest U.S. technology companies are confronted with the argument that they have grown too powerful and should be broken up, they have a ready response: breaking up Big Tech would open the way for Chinese dominance and thereby undermine U.S. national security. In a new era of great-power competition, the argument goes, the United States cannot afford to undercut superstar companies such as Amazon, Facebook, and Alphabet (the parent company of Google).

Read Here –  Foreign Affairs

How Technology Strengthens Autocracy

New technologies now afford rulers fresh methods for preserving power that in many ways rival, if not improve on, the Stasi’s tactics. Surveillance powered by artificial intelligence, for example, allows despots to automate the monitoring and tracking of their opposition in ways that are far less intrusive than traditional surveillance. Not only do these digital tools enable authoritarian regimes to cast a wider net than with human-dependent methods; they can do so using far fewer resources.

Read Here – Foreign Affairs

Who Will Lead The World In Technology: U.S., Europe, Or China?

Innovation is built upon an ecosystem that takes decades to mature. Yet, China has already made substantial advances in computer science, chemistry, engineering, and robotics, all of which pose a direct challenge to U.S. technological supremacy. However, the U.S. will remain dominant and largely unchallenged in biotech and medicine for the foreseeable future.

Read Here – American Council of Science and Health

The Retreat Of The Data Localization Brigade: India, Indonesia And Vietnam

It is clear that U.S.-based technology companies will continue to shape the geo-economic trajectory of data governance, and thus play a key role in the trade, investment and diplomatic landscape in Asia. So long as the Big Tech lobby works closely in consultation with the governments of emerging economies to respect sovereign autonomy and promote citizen welfare over rabid corporate greed, it will continue to be a key stakeholder in shaping a free, fair and equitable digital future.

Read Here – The Diplomat

Exploring China’s Orwellian Digital Silk Road

By acting as network architects and administrators, Beijing will be privy to data streams in real-time across a large portion of the world, enabling them to develop influence and power across a number of different matrixes.

Read Here – The National Interest

Twelve Million Phones, One Dataset, Zero Privacy

Every minute of every day, everywhere on the planet, dozens of companies — largely unregulated, little scrutinised — are logging the movements of tens of millions of people with mobile phones and storing the information in gigantic data files…

Read Here – The New York Times

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