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looking beyond borders

foreign policy and global economy

Archive for the tag “Afghanistan”

The Ghosts Of Past Wars Live On In A Critical Archive

The United States will soon deploy soldiers to Afghanistan born after the terrorist attacks of Sept. 11, 2001. Next August will mark the 30th anniversary of Iraq’s invasion of Kuwait, along with the subsequent American-led military buildup leading to Operation Desert Storm in January 1991. The American military has been directly engaged in the “greater Middle East” since.

Read Here – WarOnTheRocks

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In Afghanistan And Kashmir, It’s The 1980s All Over Again

While a superpower negotiates an exit from Afghanistan, India stirs up a hornet’s nest in Kashmir. It is the 1980s, and the world is at an inflection point that led to a major insurgency in Kashmir, the Afghan civil war, the rise of the Taliban, and the attacks of 9/11. Again today, the world is facing no less an important transition period as the United States is set to conclude a preliminary peace agreement with the Taliban and India’s Hindu nationalist government continues its communications and media blackout in Kashmir after having revoked the region’s nominal autonomy this month.

Read Here – Foreign Policy

Trump’s Fawning Over Pakistan’s Prime Minister Strains TiesWwith India

New Delhi is one of Washington’s most critical allies in Asia with whom it has a wide range of converging interests. Yet, by mentioning Kashmir despite how much India hates that, Trump has infuriated a vital partner in America’s Indo-Pacific strategy. The U.S.-India relationship was already in a downward spiral following India’s purchase of the Russian S-400 missile and the allusion to Kashmir has made things worse.

Read Here – The National Interest

Why A Warmer US-Pakistan Relationship Is A Win For China

On the whole, Beijing benefits from better relations between Islamabad and Washington. Chinese officials have regularly counselled their Pakistani counterparts to preserve ties with the US, even in the aftermath of the Osama bin Laden raid, which humiliated Pakistan. Deep mutual trust underpins the China-Pakistan relationship, so renewed communication between Islamabad and Washington is unlikely to make Beijing anxious – although China’s hand has been strengthened by their strained relations in the past.

Read Here – South China Morning Post

China’s Chump: Why America Can’t Trust Pakistan

Photo courtesy: White House/Flickr

As the United States prepares to cut-and-run from Afghanistan, Trump and his allies may believe that now is the time to reset relations with Pakistan. They are wrong. Under Imran Khan, Pakistan has continued its move to become an instrument of Chinese strategic policies. Successive Pakistani leaders have fallen victim to China’s debt trap. Thus, even if Khan wished to chart an independent course, it would have been impossible for him to do so.

Read Here – The National Interest

Beware The Decline Of U.S. Influence In South Asia

The United States does have important interests in the region which range from cultivating peace in Afghanistan to reigning in Chinese ambitions in Asia-Pacific. Realizing these objectives will require greater participation in regional affairs particularly between India and Pakistan, this for the sake of the United States and the region itself.

Read Here – The National Interest

Washington’s Gamble In Afghanistan

There’s a famous saying that the definition of insanity is doing the same thing over and over again and expecting different results. By that measure, Washington has tested the limits of sanity with its strategy in Afghanistan: For seventeen years, it pursued the same policy while hoping in vain that it would produce the desired outcome. Recent months, however, have brought a much-needed course correction.

Read Here – The National Interest

Richard Holbrooke and the Decline Of American Power

One of the most celebrated diplomats of his generation, Richard Holbrooke helped normalise U.S. relations with China; served as U.S. ambassador to a newly reunified Germany and then to the United Nations; and, most famously, negotiated the 1995 Dayton peace agreement that ended the war in Bosnia. But he began and ended his career struggling with how to resolve two American wars: first in Vietnam, then in Afghanistan.

Read Here – Foreign Affairs

The Ungoverned Land

In 1947, the British Raj bequeathed to the Muslims of India a tightly administered state. But next door Afghanistan couldn’t be called a normal state. It couldn’t prevent penetration of its territory and it couldn’t collect taxes. But the great proxy war in Afghanistan was approved by the West, fighting its decisive battle with the Soviet Union after the latter invaded Afghanistan in 1979.

Read Here – The Indian Express

The US-China Cold War Is Now Playing Out In Pakistan

Are America and Pakistan finally breaking up? The short answer is no. As much as both states are fed up with each other, they remain far too co-dependent to simply walk away.  What we are seeing instead is a tough and protracted re-negotiation over the terms of the relationship. The question of Pakistan’s role in Afghanistan is not necessarily the hardest issue…The far bigger question… is what India and Pakistan’s role will be in the emerging cold war between the US and China.

Read Here – Defense One

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