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Archive for the tag “Air Force”

China’s Military Advancements In The 2010s: Air And Ground

The first decade of the 21st century has seen the Chinese military (People’s Liberation Army or PLA) undergo a number of major changes, which many observers around the world have kept a keen eye on. Indeed, among the world’s major military forces, the breadth and speed with which the PLA and the Chinese military industry have changed from the beginning of 2010 to the end of 2019 is quite remarkable.

Read Here – The Diplomat

A Big Reason Why Pyongyang Fears Washington.

Can the United States and North Korea arrive at a deal—any deal—on denuclearization, normalization of relations, or at the very least a nuclear freeze? Given the holding pattern in nuclear diplomacy since the second summit between Donald Trump and Kim Jong-un in Hanoi, the prospects don’t appear particularly bright. The hold-up in the talks, however, is not simply the product of personality clashes, maximalist negotiating positions, and incongruent objectives between Washington and Pyongyang. History also has a lot to do with it.

Read Here – The National Interest

Pakistan Says It Will Return Captured Indian Pilot, As U.S. Urges De-escalation

Pakistan will return a captured pilot “as a peace gesture” to India, Pakistan’s Prime Minister Imran Khan said on Thursday, amid efforts by the United States to defuse a crisis between the two nuclear powers a day after both downed enemy jets.

Read Here – Reuters

Also Read: A time for restraint

India, Pakistan Claim To Down Each Other’s Jets As Kashmir Conflict Heats Up

India and Pakistan both said they shot down each other’s fighter jets on Wednesday, with Pakistan capturing an Indian pilot a day after Indian warplanes struck inside Pakistan for the first time since a 1971 war, prompting world powers to urge restraint.

Read Here – Reuters

Also Read: Imran Khan Calls For Talks, Urges India To Avoid ‘Miscalculation’

1,700 Planes Ready for War: Everything You Need To Know About China’s Air Force

The People’s Liberation Army Air Force of China and its sister branch, the PLA Naval Air Force, operate a huge fleet of around 1,700 combat aircraft—defined here as fighters, bombers and attack planes. This force is exceeded only by the 3,400 active combat aircraft of the U.S. military. Moreover, China operates a lot of different aircraft types that are not well known in the West.

Read Here – National Interest

F-16s, Made In India

Lockheed Martin is offering to move its entire production line for the iconic fighter plane from Texas to India. That would be a second-best option for all involved. From a U.S. perspective, the optimal outcome would be to acquire India as an F-16 customer while continuing to produce the plane in Texas and keeping the associated jobs at home. From an Indian perspective, the best outcome would be the development of an indigenous fighter aircraft to avoid reliance on anyone else’s technology.

Read Here – Foreign Affairs

India’s Real Military Problem (And It’s Not Pakistan Or China)

On its face, the bump in year-to-year defense investment appears a welcoming sign for Indian military modernization, but once the budget estimate curtain is pulled back, the actual picture indicates something more complex.

India’s Defense Industry: Reach Still Outpaces Grasp

The Chinese Military Structure

There has been a reshuffle of high-ranking PLA officers, the Global Times said in a report that also included the following structural/organisational chart of the Chinese military.

Read Here – Global Times

Courtesy: Global Times

The Flying PLA

The Pentagon’s annual report on China says that the scale of the PLAAF’s modernization is “unprecedented in history.”

Read Here – The Diplomat

How Much Military Is Enough?

Sixty-two legislators sit on the House Armed Services Committee, the largest committee in Congress. Since January, 2011, when Republicans took control of the House, the committee has been chaired by Howard P. McKeon, who goes by Buck. He has never served in the military, but this month he begins his third decade representing California’s Twenty-fifth Congressional District, the home of a naval weapons station, an Army fort, an Air Force base, and, for the Marines, a place to train for mountain warfare. McKeon believes that it’s his job to protect the Pentagon from budget cuts. On New Year’s Day, after a thirteenth-hour deal was sealed with spit in the Senate, McKeon issued a press statement lamenting that the compromise had failed to “shield a wartime military from further reductions.

Read Here – The New Yorker

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