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Archive for the tag “Australia”

After Xi: Future Scenarios For Leadership Succession In Post-Xi Jinping Era

While the fallout from previous Chinese dynastic power struggles was largely limited to within its borders, the global impact of a twenty-first century succession crisis would be immense. Indeed, under Xi Jinping, the likelihood of a succession crisis grows daily, as he continues to concentrate political power and personalize his rule in contravention of decades of evolving (albeit imperfect and limited) political norms.

Read Here | Lowy Institute

Australia’s China War Drums More Sound Than Fury

Driving the drumbeat are strategic concerns shared with Washington, with possibly some personal ambitions thrown in for good measure. Canberra is seen responding to approaches by Washington to its allies in the Pacific, principally Japan and Australia, to add their weight more openly to the US deterrent…

Read Here | Asia Times

How The Quad Can Match The Hype

A more assertive China is extending its influence across the Indo-Pacific and around the world. Existing alliances and institutions aren’t up to the task of addressing the consequences, and domestic politics across the region mean that an “Asian NATO” is off the table. That’s where the Quad comes in…

Read Here | Foreign Affairs

Major Mining Project Takes Centre Stage In Greenland Vote

Greenlanders are bracing for a snap election that is being viewed as a referendum on a controversial mine that has not yet opened. Kvanefjeld, the rare-earth mineral project near Narsaq in southern Greenland, has divided the political system for more than a decade, and is of significant importance to the global mining industry.

Read Here | Al Jazeera

US, EU, UK, Canada Launch Sanctions Blitz Against Chinese Officials; Beijing Hits Back

The USEUUK and Canada banded together to sanction Chinese officials over suspected human rights abuses in Xinjiang on Monday, a dramatic escalation in tensions with Beijing and a clear sign that the new Joe Biden administration plans to wield its alliances as a powerful tool to counter an increasingly assertive China.

Read Here | South China Morning Post

Also Read | Why Australia And New Zealand Issued Their Own Statement On US-Led China Sanctions

Can the Quad Transform Into An Alliance To Contain China?

Whither the “Quad”? Is the Quad, or Quadrilateral Security Dialogue—a loose grouping of likeminded Indo-Pacific nations—a military coalition in the making? Maybe—but how tight that fellowship becomes is largely up to Communist China, the provocateur that brought disparate partners together in the first place.

Read Here | The National Interest

The Future Of Asia: What A Difference A Year Can Make

Photo by Sam Erwin on Unsplash

The Sydney Opera resumed live performances and the city of Melbourne recently hosted the Australian Open tennis tournament with fans (mostly) in attendance. Japan is back to planning the delayed 2020 Summer Olympics, while China focuses on the Beijing 2022 Winter Games. Having been hit by COVID-19 first, Asia is also recovering first. At the pandemic’s first anniversary, is the region back to full health?

Read Here | IMF Blog

Quad Summit Next Step Towards An Asian NATO

The major Indo-Pacific powers of Australia, India, Japan and the United States concluded on Friday the first-ever summit of the Quadrilateral Security Dialogue, better known as “Quad.” The 90-minute event, conducted virtually due to Covid-19 restrictions, paves the way for a de facto “Asian NATO” amid growing concern over China’s increasingly assertive behaviour in recent years.

Read Here | Asia Times

America’s Indo-Pacific Folly

Only a decade ago, the phrase Indo-Pacific would have left most foreign policy experts scratching their heads. Today, it is not just stock language in Washington but a widely accepted reconceptualisation of Asia that is rearranging U.S. foreign policy.

Read Here | Foreign Affairs

The Quad’s Malabar Exercises Point The Way To an Asian NATO

An initially more modest Asian NATO might start with a budget of less than $1 billion, a small secretariat based in Japan or Australia, and naval-only forces committed on a purely rotational basis. It would send a strong message to China without being explicitly directed against it. 

Read Here | Foreign Policy

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