looking beyond borders

foreign policy and global economy

Archive for the tag “Australia”

Middle Powers Can Shape A New Security Framework

Day by day, the US–China confrontation is heating up. The trajectory now appears irreversible. The nations of the Indo-Pacific, Japan included, are sandwiched between the United States and China. It is high time for them to consider strengthening effective regional cooperation by building on ASEAN-centred processes.

Read Here | East Asia Forum

Australia, China Trade War Ensures Mutual Destruction

China and Australia’s trade is interlinked in many areas but the largest value items are commodities Beijing arguably cannot readily source in sufficient supply elsewhere. This is often missed when Australia and China’s trade relationship is weighed against security ties with the US and a rapidly changing world order some view as a New Cold War.

Read Here | Asia Times

US Seeks Formal Alliance Similar To NATO With India, Japan And Australia

Washington aims to formalise its closer Indo-Pacific defence relations with India, Japan and Australia – also known as “the quad” – into something more closely resembling the North Atlantic Treaty Organisation (NATO), a senior US State Department official said.

India, Australia, And Containing The China Challenge

Australia’s strategy on engaging India has long revolved around the so-called “three Cs:” cricket, curry, and the Commonwealth. In light of the changing status of bilateral relations in 2020, let’s add a couple more Cs to the list: China, and containment of.

Read Here – WarOnTheRocks

Ericsson, Nokia Are More Chinese Than Meets The Eye

Australia is shocked – shocked – to discover that its main supplier of telecom equipment, Ericsson, depends on Chinese equipment from Panda Electronics, a Nanjing-based manufacturer that appears on the Pentagon’s latest list of Chinese companies linked to the People’s Liberation Army (PLA).

Read Here – Asia Times

Economic Diplomacy: Diversification Dilemmas

Diversification might be the word of the moment in the lexicon of Australian trade debate, even though few advocates make much attempt to explain how it will actually work. But now we have two interesting efforts to quantify just how selected reductions in trade with China in different sectors might actually play out in terms of overall costs to Australian – and, for that matter, Chinese – living standards.

Read Here – Lowy Institute

Australia Boosts Defence Spending By 40% As China Tensions Rise

Australian Prime Minister Scott Morrison announced a significant increase in defence spending to boost the country’s military prowess in the Indo-Pacific, amid jitters about China’s growing power in the region. In a major speech in Canberra, Morrison said the government would spend A$270 billion (US$186 billion) on defence over the next decade, up nearly 40 per cent from the A$195 billion pledged under its previous strategic review in 2016.

Bullied by Beijing, America’s Closest Allies Regret Saying ‘Yes’ To China

The era of cooperation with China may be over soon. Australia, Britain, Canada, and New Zealand are beginning to regret saying “yes” to China’s strategic overtures. The leaders, once eager to assert a little independence from their often-overbearing superpower ally, now find themselves aligning with the United States…

Read Here – Foreign Policy

Australia Exposes China’s Many Hidden Hands

China’s state-owned enterprises may be curbing investment in Australia as relations between the two countries deteriorate, but there are rising concerns that they may be stepping up community infiltration instead. Reports suggest that the Covid-19 crisis may have led to an upsurge in  activity by agencies run by Beijing and the Chinese Communist Party (CCP) such as the United Front, a body President Xi Jinping once referred to as his “magic weapon.”

Read Here – Asia Times

Australia, India Join Forces In A Flex At China

China has drawn Australia into its security tensions with India after New Delhi and Canberra signed a defence accord that could see their two military forces sharing facilities in sea straits hotly contested by Beijing. As China and India mobilise more troops and equipment along their fractious Himalayan border, the Chinese Communist Party-backed Global Times said that Beijing could view the India-Australia accord as a direct threat.

Read Here – Asia Times

Post Navigation

%d bloggers like this: