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looking beyond borders

foreign policy and global economy

Archive for the tag “banks”

The Real Problem With The Saudi’s ‘Davos In The Desert’

It was always hard to see why a semi-medieval Middle Eastern autocracy reliant on a single fossil fuel was the best place to discuss any of those issues. And it is just as hard to believe the world will be worse off for not hearing what the IMF’s Christine Lagarde or J.P. Morgan’s Jamie Dimon think about them.

Read Here – The Spectator

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Obama Goes From White House To Wall Street In Less Than One Year

Hillary Clinton says she made a mistake when she gave speeches on Wall Street after leaving government. Taking money from banks, she writes in her new memoir, created the impression she was in their pocket. Her old boss doesn’t seem to share her concern.

Read Here – Bloomberg

China’s Debt Bomb

It’s a bomb! A mountain! A horror movie and a treadmill to hell! To doomsayers, China’s $25 trillion pile of public and private debt is a threat to the global economy. Or maybe it’s just a manageable byproduct of the boom that created the world’s second-biggest economy.

Read Here – Bloomberg

The Nation Obama Built

Courtesy: White House website official photo

Courtesy: White House website official photo

Over the past seven years, Americans have heard an awful lot about Barack Obama and his presidency, but the actual substance of his domestic policies and their impact on the country remain poorly understood. He has engineered quite a few quiet revolutions—and some of his louder revolutions are shaking up the status quo in quiet ways.

Read Here – Politico

China Stock Plunge Hits World Stocks, Dollar; U.S. Stabilizes

World stock markets plunged on Monday, after a near 9 percent dive in China shares and a sharp drop in the dollar and major commodities sent investors rushing for the exits. After dropping more than 1,000 points, or almost 7 percent, at Wall Street’s open, the Dow Jones industrial average eased losses but was still off more than 1 percent at midday. The Standard & Poor’s 500 index was down by a similar margin after the U.S. benchmark earlier dropped nearly 10 percent below its record.

Read Here – Reuters

What Europe Should Learn From Asia’s Crisis

Asian leaders could be excused a degree of exasperation over the ongoing Greek mess. China’s slowdown and stock-market chaos are worry enough; the last thing the export-dependent region needs is a Europe in chaos. Worse, European leaders seem intent on misreading or ignoring lessons from Asia’s own brush with collapse.

Read Here – Bloomberg

Buying The US – The Chinese Way

US governors are heading to China in increasing numbers to seek potential investors for public and private projects. Since 2009, US governors have led 58 trade missions to China, helping to usher in more than $34 billion in direct investment over the last five years. Those trips have helped grow total Chinese foreign direct investment (FDI) in the United States to almost $40 billion since 2000, according to the Rhodium Group consultancy.

Read here – China Business Review

Noodling In Nepal

Nepal‘s only billionaire made his name selling instant noodles. Now he’s got an eye on running the young Himalayan republic.

Read Here – Reuters

Why Sanctions Don’t Work

Sanctions, particularly economic sanctions, have long been a tool of U.S. foreign policy, and few presidents have leaned on them as much as Barack Obama or been as successful at rallying others to do the same. To thwart Iran’s nuclear ambitions, the U.S. has cajoled and bullied much of the world to slash imports of Iranian oil and freeze out Iranian banks. Most of the world has similarly choked off trade with North Korea.

Read Here – Businessweek

Cyprus May Be a Turning Point in the Eurozone Crisis

One way or another, the situation is Cyprus likely marks a major turning point in the eurozone crisis. It could be the beginning of true disaster for the zone, eventually leading to a series of sovereign debt defaults and possible exits from the euro area. It could also be the point at which we learn that the eurozone has done enough to shore itself up and regain market confidence, so that a disaster in Cyprus does not spread, now or later, to other vulnerable countries.

Read Here – Brookings

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