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Archive for the tag “Bhutan”

China’s Bhutan Gambit

China is stepping up pressure on Bhutan to settle their bilateral border dispute. In addition to laying claim to more territory in Bhutan, Beijing has revived an old land swap deal that will require Thimphu to cede control over territory in order to settle its border dispute with China.

Read Here – The Diplomat

India Is Paying The Price For Neglecting Its Neighbours

As India manages the fallout from its deadly clash with China last week—the first border skirmish in which there were troop fatalities since 1975—it would do well to take a step back and assess its broader regional situation. And if it does so, New Delhi would realise that its problems are by no means limited to Beijing: India’s relations with each of its neighbours are in shambles.

Read Here – Foreign Policy

Farewell To South Asia

“Political South Asia” was an invention of the 1980s. It has not survived the test of time. As India’s footprint goes way beyond the Subcontinent, Bangladesh becomes the throbbing heart of the Bay of Bengal and an economic bridge to East Asia and Sri Lanka emerges as an Indian Ocean hub, Delhi needs to reimagine its economic and political geography.

Read Here – The Indian Express

Doklam, One Year Later: China’s Long Game In The Himalayas

Rather than offering lessons in deterrence, recent events in Doklam illustrate the complexities of convincing China to curb its territorial ambitions. In particular, India’s so-called “reset” with China in the months since the August 2017 settlement should raise doubts about its willingness to stand up to China and ability to be a net security provider as it faces increasing challenges to its role and influence in its Southern Asian neighbourhood.

Read Here – War On The Rocks

Why Bhutan Royals’ Four-Day India Visit Matters

The King and Queen of Bhutan—Jigme Khesar Namgyel Wangchuck and Jetsun Pema Wangchuck—begin a four-day visit to India on Tuesday. The visit is significant because this is their first since the end of a military standoff between India and China on Bhutan’s Dokalam plateau on 28 August. The King and Queen will be accompanied by their young son Jigme Namgyel Wangchuck, an Indian foreign ministry statement said.

Read Here – Mint

Also read: In Letter To Tibetan Herders, Xi Sends Message On China’s Border Row With India

As Hong Kong dims, Asia Can Learn Much From Singapore, East Timor And Bhutan

The story of Asia today remains very much one driven by its largest nations and economies. An increasingly assertive China, a slow-growing Japan, a rising India and a still emerging Indonesia dominate the headlines, along with mounting tensions from the Korean peninsula. Yet, all of “Asia rising” can take a lesson from some of the region’s smallest countries.

Read Here – South China Morning Post

Indian Posturing, Post-Doklam, Has A Tragi-Comic Feel

The real lesson, therefore, that India should learn from the Doklam standoff is that it shouldn’t draw wrong conclusions. The BRICS Summit in Xiamen is not to be mistaken as a “kiss-and-make-up” moment. Deep down, India has a choice to make and China is watching closely. Should the Modi government go further down the road of trespassing into China’s core interests in the South China Sea, raking up Tibet-related issues and identifying with the United States’ containment strategy against China?

Read Here – Asia Times

Also Read: Why India Did Not ‘Win’ The Standoff With China

Lessons Learned In Tense China-India Border Row, But It Will Cast A Long Shadow

The protracted border row between China and India has ended in time for a summit of the world’s leading emerging market economies, but analysts say it will cast a long shadow over the geopolitical landscape.

Read Here – South China Morning Post

Can India And China Use BRICS To Build A House?

It would be prudent for China to stop treating India as an economic laggard to itself that can be coerced into submission and realise that such actions only push India, against its will, towards the west. India on the other hand must continue to advocate for an increased joint collaboration with China in multi-lateral institutions, even if it’s voting shares in such institutions is second to China.

Read Here – The Indian Express

Also Read: Time for India to push past anger and strengthen BRICS cooperation

Squeezed By An India-China Standoff, Bhutan Holds Its Breath

India’s main garrison in the Kingdom of Bhutan sits only 13 miles from a disputed border with China. There is a training academy, a military hospital, a golf course — all testament to India’s enduring role defending this tiny Himalayan nation.

Read Here – The New York Times

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