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Archive for the tag “border dispute”

The Crisis After The Crisis: How Ladakh Will Shape India’s Competition With China

The still-unresolved Ladakh crisis has created a new strategic reality for India, marked by renewed political hostility with China, and an increased militarisation of the Line of Actual Control. This new strategic reality imposes unequal costs on India and China.

Read Here | Lowy Institute

China’s Unrestricted War On India

In its bid to gain Asian hegemony, China views India as a major obstacle… Beijing’s ability to pressure its neighbour extends beyond the conventional battlefield and increasingly includes unconventional forms of warfare to achieve expansionist and coercive objectives. 

Read Here | Foreign Affairs

First Agreement Between China And India Since June Clash A Pledge For Peace

China and India have pledged to enhance mutual trust to ensure peace along their disputed borders in their first formal agreement since June, with Beijing saying the two nations were not a threat to each other. The pledge came as Chinese Foreign Minister Wang Yi and his Indian counterpart Subrahmanyam Jaishankar met for the first time since their border stand-off turned deadly in June, leaving 20 Indian soldiers dead and an unknown number of casualties on the Chinese side.

China-India Border Row: No Sign Of Progress As Winter Looms

Military talks on the India-China border row have yielded little progress and Indian troops must be prepared for the “long haul”, according to military and diplomatic sources in New Delhi. The assessment came after commanders from both sides held talks on Saturday – their fifth round since a deadly  clash in June in the Himalayan Galwan Valley left 20 Indian soldiers dead.

Why A ‘Nixon Moment’ In India–China Relations Is Unlikely

Calling for a ‘Nixon-in-China moment’ in India–China relations implies a set of false analogies in the relationships between India, China and the United States today, and those between the United States, China and the Soviet Union that prevailed when Richard Nixon landed in Beijing in 1972.

Read Here – EastAsiaForum

China-India Border Talks Stall, Sparking Calls For Modi To Get Tough On Beijing

As the border stand-off between Indian and Chinese troops in the Himalayan region of Ladakh enters its 15th week, with little indication of a breakthrough in talks, criticism of Prime Minister Narendra Modi’s administration is brewing in New Delhi. Unhappy at what they see as India’s overly cautious approach, a group of military veterans and analysts are increasingly calling for the Modi administration to get tough on Beijing.

Four Reasons Why India Couldn’t Win A War With China

An armed conflict will do little to resolve India’s security dilemma along the Himalayan border with China. The coronavirus and the economic downturn caused by currency demonetisation, when coupled with an expensive war, however, limited the latter might be, could lead to a serious downturn in an economy that is already bleeding.

Read Here – The National Interest

China’s Incursions Into India Are Really All about Tibet

China’s expansionism along Tibet’s southern border with India thus has a much more limited aim than the acquisition of territory of the conquest of India. It is intended to widen the buffer zone that surrounds Tibet. Trucks and trains may not stream across the India-China frontier, but people and yaks do. China wants to cut off all contact across the border, whether physical or even online.

Read Here – The National Interest

China-India Border Row: Why Narendra Modi Won’t Let Fire And Fury Ignite A War

Analysts say Modi’s aggressive tone fits the public mood and the policies of his Hindu-nationalist Bharatiya Janata Party (BJP), which has given a freer rein to the army since taking power in 2014, but he will not risk an all out conflict with his larger and better armed neighbour.

Read Here – South China Morning Post

Revelations And Opportunities: What The United States Can Learn From The Sino-Indian Crisis

If this crisis really precipitates an inflection point, analysts should observe a revised approach to the U.S.-India relationship where New Delhi undertakes to substantively balance China, Washington accommodates Indian constraints, and both demonstrate a tolerance for some difficult bargains and creative workarounds.

Read Here – WarOnTheRocks

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