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looking beyond borders

foreign policy and global economy

Archive for the tag “China”

India’s ‘Multipolar Asia’ And China

India envisions a ‘multipolar Asia’: shared regional leadership where major and minor powers have equal standing in decision-making. This model is based on the rationale that China’s rise in Asia is unbalancing the regional power structure and eroding India’s strategic choices. While a growing association with China in bilateral and multilateral mechanisms has made New Delhi more open to Beijing’s engagement, China’s strategic urge to dominate has also created a need for caution.

Read Here – East Asia Forum

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How The Global Battle For The Arctic Became The New Cold War

China has labelled itself a “near-Arctic state” and is investing in icebreakers and scientific research in an effort to wield influence over the “polar silk road”. Norway, Denmark and Canada have all claimed ownership over the North Pole based on the size and location of their respective continental shelves – data on which the UN uses to rule on questions of territorial sovereignty.

Read Here – NewStatesmanAmerica

Trump’s Trade War Isn’t Just A US–China Problem

The US and China won’t be the only ones affected in the trade war raging between the two countries. As companies scramble to find ways around the ever-increasing tariffs that the world’s two largest economies impose on each other’s goods, other countries are being drawn into a conflict that might have no winners.

Read Here – Wired

India Dismisses Beijing’s Concerns Over Kashmir Because ‘It Won’t Have Any Impact On China’

India has told China that its concerns about Kashmir are misplaced because it is an internal matter “that has no impact on China at all”. Vikram Misri, the country’s ambassador to Beijing, delivered the message as part of a defence of the decision to revoke the special status of Jammu and Kashmir, where the borders with both Pakistan and China are disputed.

Read Here – South China Morning Post

Why the New Autocrats Are Weaker Than They Look

It has been a good decade for dictatorship. The global influence of the world’s most powerful authoritarian countries, China and Russia, has grown rapidly. For the first time since the late nineteenth century, the cumulative GDP of autocracies now equals or exceeds that of Western liberal democracies.

Read Here – Foreign Affairs

The Anatomy Of The Coming Recession

Unlike the 2008 global financial crisis, which was mostly a large negative aggregate demand shock, the next recession is likely to be caused by permanent negative supply shocks from the Sino-American trade and technology war. And trying to undo the damage through never-ending monetary and fiscal stimulus will not be an option.

Read Here – Project Syndicate

The Politics Of Russia’s Primorsky Krai

Primorsky Krai is the eastern most point of East Europe, so east at that point that it stops looking like Europe and starts looking like Asia. So far east, that one tour guide at the state museum of Primorsky Krai, described Vladivostok as the edge of the world, and if the flat earth theory held true, then we’d fall off if we went any further east.

Read Here – The National Interest

The Biggest Winner Of the Japan-South Korea Dispute? China

South Korea’s decision to end an intelligence-sharing agreement with Japan, part of a widening rift between the two U.S. allies, has the Pentagon on edge — and not just because it arrives amid stalled efforts to persuade North Korea to denuclearize. “China is the biggest winner here,” said Rob Spalding, a former senior official on President Trump’s National Security Council.

Read Here – Defense One

Trump’s Trade War Tariffs On China Failing To Bring Jobs And Manufacturing Back To The US

The US president promised tariffs on Chinese goods as part of the trade war would help bring jobs back to the United States, but while firms are leaving China, it is the likes of Vietnam, Indonesia, Cambodia, Mexico, and Bangladesh that are benefiting the most.

Read Here – South China Morning Post

The Population Bust

For most of human history, the world’s population grew so slowly that for most people alive, it would have felt static. Between the year 1 and 1700, the human population went from about 200 million to about 600 million; by 1800, it had barely hit one billion. Then, the population exploded, first in the United Kingdom and the United States, next in much of the rest of Europe, and eventually in Asia.

Read Here – Foreign Affairs

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