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looking beyond borders

foreign policy and global economy

Archive for the tag “climate”

The West Can’t Fix The Climate Crisis. Asia Will Have To Do It

The climate change talks in Bonn have now wrapped up with little firm action. Next year they move to Poland. But whatever is discussed or agreed in European cities over the coming years, the answers to climate change will not come from the west (beyond a few technological tweaks), but Asia.

Read Here – The Guardian

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In The Withdrawal From The Paris Climate Agreement, The Koch Brokers’ Campaign Becomes Overt

President Trump may be the face of America’s withdrawal from the Paris climate accord, but, as deeper reporting is making clear, it’s the Kochs and their fellow fossil-fuel industry donors who really own the policy. Whether responsibility for such a consequential move will redound to their favour remains to be seen.

Read Here – The New Yorker

Obama Casts Climate Talks As World’s Last Best Chance

India's Prime Minister, Narendra Modi meeting US President o Barack Obama, on the sidelines of COP21 Summit, in Paris, France

India’s Prime Minister, Narendra Modi meeting US President o Barack Obama, on the sidelines of COP21 Summit, in Paris, France

President Barack Obama urged the world to consider the climate talks that kicked off Monday as potentially the last chance to make a meaningful impact on combating climate change. What the world needs to agree on, Obama told the 150-odd other world leaders gathered in Paris for the two-week conference, is “not a stopgap solution, but a long term strategy that gives the world confidence in a low-carbon future.”

Read Here – Politico

 

What’s The Future For the MDGs?

Since their inception in 2000, The Millennium Development Goals have revolutionized the global aid business, using specific targets to help mobilize and guide development efforts. They have encouraged world leaders to tackle multiple dimensions of poverty simultaneously and provided a standard for judging performance. As their 2015 expiration looms, the time has come to bank those successes and focus on what comes next.

Read Here – Foreign Affairs

No Wars for Water

The world economic downturn and upheaval in the Arab world might grab headlines, but another big problem looms: environmental change. Along with extreme weather patterns, rising sea levels, and other natural hazards, global warming disrupts freshwater resource availability — with immense social and political implications. Earlier this year, the Office of the Director of National Intelligence published a report, Global Water Security, assessing hydropolitics around the world. In it, the authors show that international water disputes will affect not only the security interests of riparian states, but also of the United States.

Read Here – Foreign Affairs

Race Is On as Ice Melt Reveals Arctic Treasures

With Arctic ice melting at record pace, the world’s superpowers are increasingly jockeying for political influence and economic position in outposts like this one, previously regarded as barren wastelands. At stake are the Arctic’s abundant supplies of oil, gas and minerals that are, thanks to climate change, becoming newly accessible along with increasingly navigable polar shipping shortcuts. This year, China has become a far more aggressive player in this frigid field, experts say, provoking alarm among Western powers. While the United States, Russia and several nations of the European Union have Arctic territory, China has none, and as a result, has been deploying its wealth and diplomatic clout to secure toeholds in the region.

Read Here – New York Times

10 Things You Don’t Know About Africa’s Booming Economy

Africa is no longer the “lost continent” of popular imagination. The region has been growing rapidly for over a decade, the private sector is expanding, and a new class of consumers is wielding considerable spending power. And because of its young and growing population, the sky is the limit for future growth: Between 2010 and 2020, the continent is set to add 122 million people to its labor force. An expansion of this magnitude should set the stage for dynamic growth, but capturing this potential will require a change in economic development strategy. At its current pace, Africa is not generating wage-paying jobs rapidly enough to absorb its massive labor force, which will be the largest in the world by 2035.

Read Here – Foreign Policy

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