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Archive for the tag “conflict”

Why China Prefers To Maintain Inflamed Borders

While China’s many contested border areas may appear to have become more inflamed coincident with its rising global ambitions, the reality is that Beijing has long stoked and sustained borderland disputes as a tactic to win concessions on wider issues with its neighbours.

Read Here | Asia Times

COVID-19 Poses Formidable Threat For Fragile States In The Middle East and North Africa

COVID-19 will trigger a sharp drop in household incomes in Middle East and North African (MENA) countries that are fragile and in conflict situations, such as Afghanistan, Djibouti, Iraq, Lebanon, Sudan, and Somalia. As export earnings suffer and social distancing reduces domestic activity, incomes will decline—especially for informal and low-skilled workers, including within large internally displaced populations and refugees.

Read Here – IMF

Conflict Movies Lift China’s Box Office As Studios Find More Yuan In Every Bang

With Wolf Warrior 2 crossing the 5 billion yuan (US$749 million) mark at the mainland Chinese box office on Sunday, analysts see the trend of patriotic military and action films continuing, not only boosting sluggish Chinese movie ticket sales in the second half but also lifting the fortunes of companies that invested in the smash hit.

Read Here – South China Morning Post

Trump’s ‘Arab NATO’ Vision Is A Desert Mirage

Donald Trump in Saudi Arabia. Photo Courtesy: White House

Trump was seemingly determined during his recently concluded visit to bring new vigour to the dragging war on jihadism and the West’s unsettling relationship with Iran by offering a different tact: Unite with Washington behind a common mission to eradicate a barbaric strand of Islamist extremism and, in return, Uncle Sam will mind his own business when it comes to the region’s domestic affairs.

Read Here – Stratfor

China Is Planning a Massive Sea Lab 10,000 Feet Underwater

China is speeding up efforts to design and build a manned deep-sea platform to help it hunt for minerals in the South China Sea, one that may also serve a military purpose in the disputed waters.

Read Here – Bloomberg

No Better Time For Arab Cooperation

Despite the visible role played by some Arab countries — particularly Qatar and Saudi Arabia — in the Syrian crisis, the key players in Syria’s ongoing conflict, one must admit, are not Arabs. Even when the Arab countries try to expand their role, and by extension their sway on the course of events in Syria, they tend to do it without coordination, sometimes they act against each other.

The normal clash of interests may provide a simple explanation for this phenomenon, yet, the key reason lies in the lack of an inclusive mechanism for regional cooperation and security in the Arab world. In fact, the Arab world is the only world region that lacks any form of collective security formula to deal with conflicts in and among its member states.

Read Here – Gulf News

 

Tensions flare over South China Sea at Asian summit

Japan warned on Monday that a row over the SouthChina Sea could damage “peace and stability” in Asia as China stalled on a plan to ease tensions and disagreements flared between the Philippines and Cambodia over the dispute.

The acrimony provided an uneasy backdrop to U.S. President Barack Obama‘s arrival in Cambodia for a regional summit where he is expected to urge China and Southeast Asian nations to resolve the row, one of Asia’s biggest security issues.

Japanese Prime Minister Yoshihiko Noda challenged efforts by summit host Cambodia, a staunch China ally, to limit discussions on the mineral-rich sea, where China’s territorial claims overlap those of four Southeast Asian countries and of Taiwan.

Read Here – Reuters

Why the United States is Not Ready for Conflict in Asia.

When I was in Seoul a few weeks ago, the English-language news program Korea Today broadcast a strangely fascinating story about an “I Love Dokdo” contest at Taegu University. The idea was to see who could come up with the most inspiring tribute to the patch of microislands that has been the focus of a recurring and bitter dispute with Japan. It was strange to see young Koreans sitting on a spare, modernist television set, smiling, laughing and calmly celebrating a nationalist routine. Even odder was the fact that a Mexican exchange student named Emilio, along with a multinational team, won the contest. The goal of their performance, he said on Korea Today, was to “to express our love for Dokdo,” in part by showing “the people who have protected Dokdo throughout history” and demonstrating “how beautiful” the islands are.

Read Here – Foreign Policy

No Wars for Water

The world economic downturn and upheaval in the Arab world might grab headlines, but another big problem looms: environmental change. Along with extreme weather patterns, rising sea levels, and other natural hazards, global warming disrupts freshwater resource availability — with immense social and political implications. Earlier this year, the Office of the Director of National Intelligence published a report, Global Water Security, assessing hydropolitics around the world. In it, the authors show that international water disputes will affect not only the security interests of riparian states, but also of the United States.

Read Here – Foreign Affairs

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