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Archive for the tag “data”

The Danger Of Blindly Navigating Data Nationalism

Many companies with a digital focus rely on data as part of their business model, while governments are increasingly worried about the privacy and security issues that arise as a result. But what business practices are acceptable? And what are the limits of appropriate governmental regulation? Unfortunately, international rules in this area are underdeveloped and do not adequately address these issues. 

Read Here – The National Interest

India’s Chinese App Ban Seen Jolting ByteDance’s India Plans

An Indian ban on dozens of Chinese apps following a border clash between the two nations has possibly derailed a $1 billion India expansion plan of China’s ByteDance, while also sparking an uproar from users of its popular TikTok video app. TikTok was blocked on Google and Apple app stores in India after New Delhi said it was among the 59 apps which it believed posed a “threat to sovereignty and integrity”.

Read Here – Reuters

When Astrologers Rule

There is no science for making decisions when facing uncertainty. “Incalculable risks” are just that—incalculable. The best way to manage uncertainty is to rely on information drawn from a variety of independently financed and conducted experiments, rather than relying on a single, seemingly legitimate answer—whether from the stars or from data points. But politicians too often want the latter. Perhaps instead of politicians, we need statesmen—people who can stand up to groupthink and “facile theories”—to guide our response to crisis.

Read Here – Law & Liberty

Asia’s Cyberwar Goes Viral

China’s apparent attempt to pull off a cyber heist of critical medical and laboratory data occurs against the backdrop of duelling narratives about the origins and handling of COVID-19. These two issues highlight Asia’s new era of cyber and information warfare.

Read Here – The National Interest

It’s Now Or Never For National Data Strategies

While the private sector is rushing ahead to amass as much data as it can, governments and public policymakers are only just beginning to grapple with the unique challenges posed by data-driven markets. As a critical resource that is unlike anything that came before it, big data demands a robust policy response.

Read Here – Project Syndicate

India’s Growing Surveillance State

India’s neighbour to the north, China, looms large in international media as an Orwellian state, with its expanding use of facial recognition technology and invasive data collection practices. By contrast, India is often portrayed as a chaotic democracy, its government far weaker and less capable than the fine-tuned autocracy in Beijing. That image belies the changing reality in India, where the government’s embrace of powerful new surveillance technologies increasingly threatens the rights of its people.

Read Here – Foreign Affairs

Governments Are Clamping Down On Foreign Tech Investments

State inspection of foreign investments at home isn’t novel. Probing NGOs and mandating registration of foreign lobbyists are just two decades-old examples. What’s different today is that countries are accelerating and expanding these powers where they already exist, or freshly architecting them altogether. It’s a way for governments to address two things: perceived foreign influence over their domestic technology spheres, and perceived risks of foreign governments using investments and acquisitions to access sensitive data.

Read Here – Wired

The Retreat Of The Data Localization Brigade: India, Indonesia And Vietnam

It is clear that U.S.-based technology companies will continue to shape the geo-economic trajectory of data governance, and thus play a key role in the trade, investment and diplomatic landscape in Asia. So long as the Big Tech lobby works closely in consultation with the governments of emerging economies to respect sovereign autonomy and promote citizen welfare over rabid corporate greed, it will continue to be a key stakeholder in shaping a free, fair and equitable digital future.

Read Here – The Diplomat

Exploring China’s Orwellian Digital Silk Road

By acting as network architects and administrators, Beijing will be privy to data streams in real-time across a large portion of the world, enabling them to develop influence and power across a number of different matrixes.

Read Here – The National Interest

Twelve Million Phones, One Dataset, Zero Privacy

Every minute of every day, everywhere on the planet, dozens of companies — largely unregulated, little scrutinised — are logging the movements of tens of millions of people with mobile phones and storing the information in gigantic data files…

Read Here – The New York Times

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