Advertisements

looking beyond borders

foreign policy and global economy

Archive for the tag “debt”

Three Myths About China’s Investment In Africa And Why They Need To Be Dispelled

Three common misconceptions in Western media and policy circles about the nature of China’s involvement in Africa interferes with US policymakers’ ability to craft and implement an effective Africa strategy. Debunking these myths will foster a more constructive understanding of Beijing’s interactions with the continent and allow the United States to focus on areas of competitive advantage.

Read Here – World Economic Forum

Advertisements

Rethinking Belt-And-Road Debt

More than 75 nations participate in China’s Belt and Road Initiative, launched in 2013 to develop trade and connect Asia, Africa, the Middle East and Europe with ports, roads and railways. But some countries worry about adding to already heavy debt burdens, and some projects have become an issue in local politics. Among the most vocal critics is Malaysia’s Prime Minister Mahathir Mohamad who has warned about a new colonialism.

Read Here – Yale Global

Trade Deficit Tops China-Africa Summit In Beijing

Chinese tourists in South Africa. Pix/LBB

The continent is an important part of Xi’s Belt and Road initiative – a plan to bolster a network of infrastructure connecting China by land and sea to Southeast Asia, Central Asia, the Middle East, Europe, and Africa. China has pledged $126bn for the plan, which has been praised by its supporters as a source of vital financing for the developing world. Critics say Africa is loading itself up on Chinese debt that countries may struggle to repay, with estimates ranging in the tens of billions of dollars.

Read Here – Al Jazeera

How Can Imran Khan Deal With Chinese Debt?

Pakistan’s freshly minted Prime Minister Imran Khan has an unusual opportunity. If he plays his cards right, he can keep his rivals, including his controversial predecessor Nawaz Sharif, tied in knots for a long time. Or he can duck the bouncer, and play the game as it has been played, ensuring that Pakistan remains a client state, although of a different master—China.

Read Here – Mint

Fixing Pakistan’s Financial Woes

In what has become somewhat of a ritual, Pakistan is back at the doorsteps of international creditors. The PML-N government has left national coffers empty, just like the PPP and the Musharraf-led PML-Q governments before it. Like clockwork, Pakistan goes to the IMF after every election: 2008, 2013 and now 2018. This time the request for financial assistance is expected to be the largest ever.

Read Here – Dawn

Pakistan’s Economic Turmoil Threatens China’s Ambitions

Some in Pakistan have speculated that China may oppose an IMF program out of concerns that it would compel China to release the financing terms of many CPEC projects. But outside of situations where external debt restructuring is required, it would be exceedingly unusual for the IMF to make such a demand. Instead, the IMF would likely require confidential data on debt payment schedules and other financial information necessary to understand Pakistan’s full balance of payments situation.

Read Here – Foreign Policy

China Has No Idea How To Play Trump, And Is Doing What It Always Does When It Smells Trouble

Thanks to US President Donald Trump and his “America first” policy, the global economic and trade outlook perhaps has never been so uncertain. Nowhere are these economic and policy shock waves being felt more than in China. And, Beijing is responding the same way it does every time it anticipates trouble – by pumping cash into its system.

Read Here – South China Morning Post

U.S. Deficits Are Hurting Emerging Markets

Thanks to the dollar’s outsize global role, the first casualties of a somewhat irresponsible U.S. fiscal policy are likely to be emerging economies that have used the dollar to denominate their debts, not the United States itself. A stronger dollar and rising U.S. interest rates are increasing the burden of paying all dollar-denominated debts around the world.

Read Here – Foreign Affairs

A Chinese Colony Takes Shape In Cambodia

While Prime Minister Hun Sen often portrays himself as sole protector of Cambodia’s sovereignty, China is at work building a port, airport and virtual city on 45,000 hectares of Cambodian land with the premier’s express permission.

Read Here – Asia Times

Also Read: Myanmar Risks Falling Into China’s Debt Trap

China’s Looming Financial Crisis

Governor of the Reserve Bank of Australia Philip Lowe’s speech last week highlighting the risks to the Chinese financial system from shadow banks – non-bank financial institutions often operating in more lightly regulated wholesale markets – has once again drawn attention to the major economic risk in China.

Read Here – Lowy Institute

Post Navigation

%d bloggers like this: