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looking beyond borders

foreign policy and global economy

Archive for the tag “debt”

Will Xi Jinping’s Second Term Bring ‘New Cycle’ For The Economy?

A growing number of economists are joining the chorus forecasting the arrival of a stronger Chinese economy under President Xi Jinping – a stark contrast from a year ago, when China was seen as a source of instability for the world. Although Beijing has delivered scant evidence that it is taming its debt mountain, the optimists are starting to make their voices heard over talk of a hard landing or crisis in China’s growth narrative.

Read Here – South China Morning Post

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Trump Must Tread Carefully With His Asian Bankers

As Donald Trump angles to make America’s debt burden great again, he has some finessing to do with his bankers. No, not Russia in this case, but China and Japan, both by far the biggest holders of U.S. Treasuries with a combined $2.3 trillion. South Korea’s $95 billion stockpile also has folks in Seoul curious about President Trump adding at least $1.5 trillion of debt for giant tax cuts America doesn’t need.

Read Here – Asia Times

The Demise Of Dollar Diplomacy?

Pundits have been saying last rites for the dollar’s global dominance since the 1960s – that is, for more than half a century now. But the pundits may finally be right, because the greenback’s dominance has been sustained by geopolitical alliances that are now fraying badly.

Read Here – Project Syndicate

Yes, Nations Can Spend Their Way Out of Recessions. Sometimes.

The case for government spending during economic slowdowns has been hotly debated for decades. John Maynard Keynes went as far as to suggest that during a recession governments should pay people to do meaningless tasks — such as digging holes in the ground and then filling them up.

Read Here – BloombergView

An Economic Fallout Is Coming From All The Asian Military Standoffs

The stakes are high for the U.S. as tensions in Asia ramp up. The country has $1.3 trillion of two-way trade with the region, based on annualised data in the first six months of this year. That’s 52.5 percent of America’s total foreign trade. But that is only part of U.S. linkage with Asian economies. Fixed-asset investments generating those trade flows have also to be taken into account as they directly affect employment and income levels in about one-third of American aggregate demand.

Read Here – CNBC

How One City’s Borrowing Practice Highlights China’s Daunting Financial Risks

China’s finance ministry was technically correct when it reacted to a sovereign debt rating downgrade in May by saying the debts of local government financing vehicles (LGFVs) and state-owned enterprises would not swell the government’s contingent liabilities.

Read Here – South China Morning Post

Pakistan Can’t Afford China’s ‘Friendship’

Pakistani and Chinese officials boast that CPEC will help address Pakistan’s electricity generation problem, bolster its road and rail networks, and shore up the economy through the construction of special economic zones. But these benefits are highly unlikely to materialise. The project is more inclined to leave Pakistan burdened with unserviceable debt while further exposing the fissures in its internal security.

Read Here – Foreign Policy

Has Asia Learned From The 1997 Crisis?

Reform is always easier when a crisis leaves policy makers no other options. But without further change, Asia will continue to rely too much on debt instead of productivity gains for growth. In poorer nations, improvements in household welfare will lag. As in the years before 1997, economic irregularities could build up to the point where the region faces another crisis. Will the next Kim Dae-jungs be there when you need them?

Read Here – Bloomberg View

America Owes China $1 trillion. That’s A Problem For Beijing, And Trump Knows It

Indeed, the US-China relationship is a classic example of the old saw: if you owe the bank a thousand dollars, you have a problem; if you owe the bank a trillion dollars, the bank has a problem. Trump holds the important cards and it is simply a case of whether he wants to play them.

Read Here – The Guardian

Cambodia, Sri Lanka And The China Debt Trap

The influx of Chinese economic assistance into Sri Lanka and Cambodia has raised questions regarding the intentions behind these massive loans. While China may still be considered a developing economy, its current strategy of providing soft power loans and aid to its regional neighbours is reminiscent of the tributary system that the country employed back in its empire days.

Read Here – East Asia Forum

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