America Hasn’t Lost Its Demographic Advantage

To the extent that crude demographic trends matter in world affairs, they have been running to the United States’ advantage for some time. But big changes are underway. The initial returns from the U.S. 2020 census and the reports about last year’s birth totals offered sobering news. Read Here | Foreign Affairs

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Sex And The Chinese Economy

As the Chinese government has started to worry about the country’s low population growth, it has progressively relaxed its family-planning policy. Policymakers should now go further, and provide a significant financial reward to parents of baby girls. Read Here | Project Syndicate

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The Coming Demographic Collapse Of China

China this century is on track to experience history’s most dramatic demographic collapse in the absence of war or disease. Today, the country has a population more than four times larger than America’s. By 2100, the U.S. will probably have more people than China. Read Here | The National Interest

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The Population Bust

For most of human history, the world’s population grew so slowly that for most people alive, it would have felt static. Between the year 1 and 1700, the human population went from about 200 million to about 600 million; by 1800, it had barely hit one billion. Then, the population exploded, first in the United […]

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Shrinking China: A Demographic Crisis

…Unfortunately for the Chinese, their country’s population is about to peak and then shrink fast. Fewer people may not necessarily mean less power, but a shriveling population requires the country’s leadership to overcome demographic trends rather than be propelled by them, as it has since the founding of the People’s Republic in 1949. Read Here […]

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The Immigrant Imbroglio

For much of this year, discrimination of immigrants and racism have been hotly debated in a country where 14% of its 9.6m people are foreign born. Now the riots could make immigration and integration the pivotal debate in Swedish politics. Read Here – The Economist

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