looking beyond borders

foreign policy and global economy

Archive for the tag “Developing country”

Britain Is Now A Developing Country

Britain is a rich country accruing many of the stereotypical bad habits of a developing country.

Read Here – The Guardian

The New New Thing

It is the new new normal: a way to describe the persistent state of subpar economic growth plaguing developed nations.

Read Here – Bloomberg

Going Down, BRIC By BRIC

The largest developing nations for the first time have the worst market opportunities as optimism for stronger growth shifts to the U.S. and Europe, according to a Bloomberg Global Poll.

Read Here – Bloomberg

Why The West Has A Problem With The Emerging World…

Our imperialist mindset — a hangover from the 20thcentury — suggests that developing countries are always helpless without the West. That says more about our limited analytical abilities than about how the emerging world will fare, writes Zachary Karabell

 

Our World’s People Problem

The world’s population will hit 7.2 billion next month and 10.9 billion by 2100, with most of the growth a result of high birthrates in the developing world, the United Nations has said. The UN’s latest “World Population Prospects” report on Thursday said the number of people inhabiting the planet at the start of the next century could top 16.6 billion, or depending on the statistical model, could be as low as 6.8 billion. In either case, the population in the world’s poorest regions is anticipated to rise dramatically, the UN said.

Read Here – Al Jazeera

The World’s Getting Old and How!

By 2025, the world will have almost 800 million people over the age of 65. About 556 million of them will be in developing countries, another 254 million in developed ones. On a global scale, Asia absorbs the majority, and it seems as though Latin America will have “only” about 70 million. These demographic forecasts are not exact, but they offer an idea about the magnitude of the challenge.

Read Here – WorldCrunch

The New Delhi Consensus

One of the more remarkable (though largely unremarked) developments in recent Indian politics has been the startling shift in the country’s discourse about capitalism. As in many developing countries, “self-reliance” and economic self-sufficiency were India’s national mantras after independence – and, in India’s case, remained so for more than four decades. Whereas most Westerners axiomatically associate capitalism with freedom, India’s nationalists associated it with slavery. After all, the British East India Company, that harbinger of capitalism, had come to trade and stayed to rule.

Read Here – Project Syndicate

That India Vs China Debate…Again

Most of us still look at China, the world’s second-largest economy, as the undisputed leader among major developing countries. In the long run, however, I’m betting on India to emerge as the more significant global economy.

Those who are dazzled by China often forget that much of the rapid growth before 2008 was caused by the shift of global manufacturing from Europe and the U.S., not by domestic-oriented activity. China’s economy remains export-driven, with consumers accounting for only 38 percent of gross domestic product, far below the levels of many developing and developed countries.

 

Read Here – Bloomberg

 

China Stresses Peaceful Development After US Report

China stressed its adherence to peaceful development in response to a U.S. intelligence report predicting that China will surpass the United States to become the world’s largest economy before 2030.

“China will unswervingly pursue a way of peaceful development. China’s development aims at making greater contributions toward peace and development of mankind, as well as a happy life for its people, instead of overwhelming others or scrambling for world dominance,” said Foreign Ministry spokesman Hong Lei.

Hong made the remarks at a regular press briefing while commenting on the report “Global Trends 2030: Alternative Worlds” issued on Monday by the U.S. National Intelligence Council, an analytical arm of the government’s Office of the Director of National Intelligence.

The report said China’s economy is likely to surpass that of the United States a few years before 2030; however, it added that China may not replace the United States on a global level. “Despite the remarkable achievements made since reform and opening-up, China is still the world’s biggest developing country and has a long way to go in realizing socialist modernization. We have a clear understanding of that,” the spokesman said.

Read Here – China Daily

China’s Economic Espionage

Mao Zedong believed that revolutionary fervor could overcome technological backwardness. But when more pragmatic leaders took power in Beijing, they found that China lagged so far behind the West that the country risked permanent second-class status.

Mao’s successor, Deng Xiaoping, launched China’s rise by reforming the economy and opening the country to the West. With this opening, however, came a long-running, state-sponsored espionage program to acquire advanced technology and accelerate the growth of China’s civil and military industries. And when Western companies first went into China, they believed that the damage from espionage was tolerable, part of the cost of doing business in the world’s fastest-growing market, and that they could “run faster” to create new technologies, thereby minimizing any loss. But what was tolerable when China was a developing economy is no longer acceptable when it is the second-largest economy in the world and a potential military competitor.

Read Here – Foreign Affairs

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