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looking beyond borders

foreign policy and global economy

Archive for the tag “developing nations”

The West Can’t Fix The Climate Crisis. Asia Will Have To Do It

The climate change talks in Bonn have now wrapped up with little firm action. Next year they move to Poland. But whatever is discussed or agreed in European cities over the coming years, the answers to climate change will not come from the west (beyond a few technological tweaks), but Asia.

Read Here – The Guardian

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A Climate Agreement Powered By Hypocrisy

The agreement reached in Paris contains promises that, if enacted between now and the target date of 2030, will cost the global economy at least $1 trillion dollars a year – and possibly twice as much if politicians make inefficient policy choices. This makes the agreement the costliest in history.

Read Here – Project Syndicate

The Climate Talks in Paris Might Actually Work This Time

United Nations climate talks set to begin in Paris next week promise to produce a landmark deal that has eluded diplomats for more than two decades. All of the Group of 20 nations, including the biggest developing countries — China, India and Brazil — have prepared to limit emissions into the next decade. Plunging costs for wind and solar power mean alternatives to fossil fuels are more viable.

Read Here – Bloomberg

Lowering World Poverty Depends On India

The future of global inequality, in other words, rests on India’s shoulders. To join the global middle class, India must do much better. It must improve infrastructure and education. It must implement good governance and reduce harmful corruption. It must attract foreign investment and make growth a priority. And it must do all this while limiting its use of coal, in order to help halt the danger from global warming.

Read Here – Bloomberg View

A Tight Squeeze

During the financial crisis, when the global economy faced its gravest threat since the 1930s, policymakers sprang into action. To stimulate the economy, central banks slashed interest rates and politicians spent lavishly. As a result, the recession, though bad, was far less severe than the Depression. Unfortunately, however, that quick response nearly exhausted governments’ economic arsenals. Seven years later they remain depleted. Central banks’ benchmark interest rates hover above zero; government debt and deficits have ballooned. Should recession strike again, as inevitably it will, rich countries in particular will be ill-equipped to fend it off.

Read Here – The Economist

Preacher’s Pernicious Myth

The west has lost the power to shape the world in its own image – as recent events, from Ukraine to Iraq, make all too clear. So why does it still preach the pernicious myth that every society must evolve along western lines, asks Pankaj Mishra

Read Here – The Guardian

World’s 85 Richest = 3.5 Billion Poorest

The poorest half of the world’s population—that’s 3.5 billion people—control as much wealth as the richest 85 individuals!

Read Here – Businessweek

Asia Century A Lot Of Hot Air

A recent report on the humdrum subject of plans to build new coal-burning plants to generate electricity helps to explain why Asia – led by its rising economic giants, China and India – is at the epicentre of concern about global warming and climate change.

Policy makers from nearly all of the world’s countries meet this week and next in Doha, Qatar, for annual UN climate negotiations and researchers have been issuing fresh calls on the need for action to reduce the relentless rise in greenhouse gas emissions from human activity, which are heating the world.

They do so as the Kyoto Protocol, the existing plan for curbing these emissions, is due to expire at the end of the year. The protocol has been ineffective because it is limited to developed nations, which no longer produce the bulk of emissions – the United States, although it signed the UN pact, refused to ratify it.

Read Here – Canberra Times

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