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Archive for the tag “diplomacy”

The End Of American Power

Beyond the realm of policy, a Trump victory would mark a sea change for the United States’ relationship with the rest of the world. It would signal to others that Washington has given up its aspirations for global leadership and abandoned any notion of moral purpose on the international stage. 

Read Here | Foreign Affairs

The Strange Saga Of Meng Wanzhou

Until she was detained by the Royal Canadian Mounted Police while transiting Vancouver International Airport, the world had not heard of Meng Wanzhou. Now everybody knows that Meng, 48, is the chief financial officer of Huawei and the daughter of Ren Zhengfei, chief executive officer and founder of China’s leading technology giant.

Read Here | Asia Times

Malabar Naval Drills: Are Australia, India, The US And Japan Challenging China?

The expanded drills mark a major upgrade in military cooperation between Canberra and New Delhi since the 2017 resumption of the Quadrilateral Security Dialogue, or “Quad” – which is composed of the same four countries – after a decade-long hiatus, and comes as Australia and India manage increasingly antagonistic relations with Beijing.

Read Here | Foreign Policy

America Needs To Talk About A China Reset

The next administration has to tackle the U.S.-Chinese rivalry fast—and head-on. It doesn’t have to deliver peace and goodwill, or end the “cold war” with China. Washington and Beijing have fundamental differences on an array of issues, such as the South China Sea, trade, and ideology. None of these issues can be easily solved—they can only be worked on.

Read Here | Foreign Policy

“Preparing for War”: What Is China’s Xi Jinping Trying To Tell Us?

The U.S. military is already strapped for resources trying to police the Indo-Pacific, and this is peacetime. If the United States lost a sizable fraction of the U.S. Pacific Fleet and affiliated joint forces in a contest in the Taiwan Strait—even a triumphant one—its capacity to retain its superpower standing and preside over the liberal maritime order would be diminished. It could win locally but lose globally.

Read Here | The National Interest

Sleepwalking Into World War III

The Trump administration has consistently elevated military voices over those of experienced civil servants in the development of foreign policy, and funding cuts to non-defense federal agencies, along with the resignations of many career civil servants, have left government offices woefully understaffed.

Read Here | Foreign Affairs

Team Biden Should Start With An Asia Pivot 2.0

The recent meeting of the Quadrilateral Security Dialogue in Tokyo revealed many of the dilemmas the United States faces in its attempt to contain China—no matter who wins the race for the White House. On one level, it was remarkable that the meeting of foreign ministers from Australia, India, Japan, and the United States happened at all, given India’s traditional reluctance to antagonise China.

Read Here | Foreign Policyhttps://foreignpolicy.com/2020/10/19/biden-trump-china-india-asia-pivot/

Bangladesh Wins And Loses In China-India rivalry

Which of the two Asian giants has more sway in Dhaka these days is debatable. But with India distracted with a spiralling Covid-19 epidemic and with several unresolved bilateral sore points, China may have an upper hand, one it is now seeking to consolidate to its strategic advantage.

Read Here | Asia Times

These NATO Nuances Create National Security Issues

What ails the Atlantic alliance is not a lack of capabilities or resources—after all, the Euro-Atlantic basin holds eight hundred million people, a combined $20 trillion in gross domestic product and several of the world’s leading military powers—but the political commitment to use them. 

Read Here | The National Interest

North Korea’s Huge New Missile Sends A Message To Washington

North Korea unveiled a massive new intercontinental ballistic missile Saturday at a parade commemorating the 75th anniversary of the founding of the Workers’ Party of Korea, a signal to Washington that the regime is committed to advancing its long-range strike capabilities despite years of on-again, off-again diplomatic outreach with the United States.

Read Here | Foreign Policy

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