Advertisements

looking beyond borders

foreign policy and global economy

Archive for the tag “diplomacy”

Xi Calls For ‘New Long March’ In Dramatic Sign That China Is Preparing For Protracted Trade War

Chinese President Xi Jinping has called for the nation to embark on a new Long March and “start all over again”, in the most dramatic sign to date that Beijing has given up hope of reaching a trade deal with the United States in the near term. Xi is in Jiangxi province for his first domestic tour since the escalation of the trade war two weeks ago. Jiangxi is where China’s defeated Red Army started its fabled Long March in 1934.

Read Here – South China Morning Post

Also Read: China Raises Threat of Rare-Earths Cutoff To U.S. 

Advertisements

The Chinese Diplomats Defending Huawei On All Fronts – Including Twitter

Some Chinese diplomats have responded to US moves to blacklist Huawei with accusations the decision was “politically motivated”, others have threatened retaliation, and at least one has posted goofy memes on social media in defence of the tech giant.

Read Here – South China Morning Post

What Will India Look Like If Modi Returns To Power?

Indian liberals fear that a second term for Prime Minister Narendra Modi might prompt a decisive turn against the country’s secular traditions, much as the American left fears that Donald Trump’s return would irreparably harm U.S. democratic institutions. This Modi-as-strongman thesis places India squarely within a global autocratic resurgence, featuring a familiar tableau of leaders from Turkey’s Recep Tayyip Erdogan to Rodrigo Duterte of the Philippines.

Read Here – Foreign Policy

Is Trump’s Trade War With China A Civilisational Conflict?

Recent remarks by a senior Trump administration official suggest that the United States’ current approach to China is dangerously misconceived. The rise of China under a one-party dictatorship should be met with a united front in defense of the liberal order, not talk of a clash of Caucasian and non-Caucasian civilizations.

Read Here – Project Syndicate

Beyond The China-US Trade War: What Next For The World’s Two Giants?

The wide differences and deep distrust between the two powers has been highlighted again with the latest abrupt turn in the bilateral trade negotiations. With or without a trade deal, the turbulence in economic ties, widely viewed as the ballast of China-US relations, heralds more choppy waters ahead.

Read Here – South China Morning Post

China’s Role In The India–Pakistan Nuclear Equation

Most international analysts focus on the India–Pakistan nuclear equation as a bilateral issue, but it’s essentially triangular in its origin and core dynamics. China has largely escaped accountability for its cynical role in nuclearising the region. Beijing’s irresponsibility needs to be called out.

Read Here – The Strategist

Five Big New Indo-Pacific Ideas For New Delhi

As the Indo-Pacific concept becomes a more central part of India’s foreign policy, here are five ideas for this Indo-Pacific desk to consider, all of which aim to advance the shared vision of a “free, open, and inclusive Indo-Pacific” promoted by India, the United States, Japan, and others.

Read Here – The Diplomat

Is Russia Sleepwalking Into Chinese Dominance?

China and Russia both have features that unite them. Both are blatantly autocratic, show a callous disregard for human rights, and share an openness to using military force in their neighbourhoods. They also share a great interest in pushing back the West’s influence in the world. Yet, despite these various areas of cooperation, the list of potential conflict points between the two powers is long.

Read Here – WM Centre For European Studies

All the King’s Consultants

Experts play valuable and highly visible roles advising leaders in wealthy liberal democracies and international institutions. But far less is known about what they do—and to what effect—for authoritarian regimes and developing countries. That’s a problem, because autocratic leaders from China to Saudi Arabia increasingly rely on experts, especially from top consulting firms, universities, and think tanks in the West.

Read Here – Foreign Affairs

The Spies Who Came In From The Continent

From John le Carré’s novels to the insatiable popular interest in James Bond, Britain has long enjoyed, and cultivated, an image of producing superior spies. This reputation is based on more than myth. For decades during and following World War II, the painstaking real-world work of British intelligence officers was one of the United Kingdom’s primary sources of power.

Read Here – Foreign Policy

Post Navigation

%d bloggers like this: