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Archive for the tag “diplomacy”

Zuckerberg Offers the Bare Minimum On The Cambridge Analytica Mess

Two years and four months after Facebook found out that Cambridge Analytica might have illicitly pulled user data from its platform, and five days after the latest round of stories about the political consultancy’s electioneering, Mark Zuckerberg finally made a statement about the situation.

Read Here – The Atlantic


Chinese Premier Li Keqiang Rejects Claims Beijing Is Trying To Buy Global Influence

Chinese Premier Li Keqiang rejected suggestions that China was leveraging its economic strength to gain political influence on the world stage…The United States, Germany, India and Australia have all raised concerns about China’s growing influence, which has expanded significantly through its trade and infrastructure development plan known as the “Belt and Road Initiative”.

Read Here – South China Morning Post

Ending A Decade Of Silence, Israel Reveals It Blew Up Assad’s Nuclear Reactor

The State of Israel formally acknowledged that its air force blew up a Syrian nuclear reactor in the area of Deir Ezzor in the pre-dawn hours between September 5 and 6, 2007, in a mission known to much of the world as Operation Orchard. The official confirmation ends a 10-and-a-half year policy of referring to the event with a smirk and a wry “according to foreign reports.”

Read Here – Times of Israel

China’s Xi Jinping And Russia’s Vladimir Putin Are Putting Strongman Politics Back On The Map

Strongman politics is back. And for anyone who thought otherwise, a quick peruse of this weekend’s headlines should help set them straight. In Beijing, Chinese President Xi Jinping received a thunderous ovation at the Great Hall of the People as he was sworn in for a second term, just minutes after receiving a unanimous mandate to do so and less than a week after lawmakers voted to revise the constitution and remove the two-term limit. In Moscow, Vladimir Putin became Russian president for the fourth time.

Read Here – South China Morning Post

How Long Will the World’s Most Powerful Leaders Last?

The international pecking order is usually defined by economic and military might. That puts the U.S. at the top of the pile, with China gaining fast in second place. But when it comes to tackling long-term global challenges such as climate change, poverty or peacemaking, it’s also vital to identify which leaders are likely to stick around.

Read Here – Bloomberg

Don’t Push Us, China Says To Trump’s Demand For US$100 Billion Cut In The Sino-US Trade Gap

Beijing underscored its determination to protect its interests after Washington demanded a US$100 billion cut in China’s trade surplus with the United States.  Chinese foreign ministry spokesman Lu Kang said that the two countries should resolve their disputes through talks, since a trade war would not benefit either country. China would protect its legitimate rights if “something happens we don’t want to see”, he said.

Read Here – South China Morning Post

The Man Behind The North Korea Negotiations

Kim Jong Un and Donald Trump are the volatile, captivating stars of North Korea’s nuclear drama—including the shocking twist last week in which Trump said he would accept Kim’s reported offer of a summit meeting. Given the outsized personalities at center stage, it’s easy to forget who is actually directing the plot: South Korean President Moon Jae In, who over the past eight months has been quietly pushing events to this point.

Read Here – The Atlantic  

For Islam And Against America: What Fuelled Pakistan’s Nuclear Black Market?

Evidence indicates that it is difficult to make generalisations about the whole nuclear proliferation episode involving Pakistan, as different sets of motivations, circumstances, and players were involved in the three cases under discussion. Even the different stages of each case require separate treatment—for example, both Iran and North Korea did nuclear deals with the AQ Khan network in two separate stages, with a gap in between.

Read Here – Quartz

Ma Zhaoxu: China’s Next Man At The United Nations … And On The Front Line Of Xi’s Global Ambitions

Former foreign ministry spokesman Ma Zhaoxu will become China’s ambassador to the United Nations headquarters in New York, one of the country’s most prestigious overseas posts, according to diplomatic sources. Ma, 54, returned to Beijing last week after a 20-month stint as the country’s top envoy to the UN in Geneva. As China’s point man at the UN headquarters will be at the forefront of a more ambitious and assertive foreign policy under President Xi Jinping.

Read Here – South China Morning Post

The ‘Indo-Pacific’: Redrawing The Map To Counter China

The shift reflects the Trump administration’s acknowledgement of several key factors: It treats India as a regional power and not just an isolated country on the southern tip of the continent. It emphasises the contiguous maritime nature of this vast space, which spans two of the world’s three largest oceans, four of the of world’s seven largest economies, and the world’s five most populous countries.

Read Here – The Cipher Brief

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