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Archive for the tag “Economists”

The AI Frontier Of Economic Theory

Until recently, data sets were small and costly, and computers were slow and expensive. So it is natural that as gains in computing power have dramatically reduced these impediments, economists have rushed to use big data and artificial intelligence to help them spot patterns in all sorts of activities and outcomes.

Read Here – Project Syndicate

What Economists Still Need To Learn

More than a decade after the global financial crisis, macroeconomists have failed to absorb three crucial sets of lessons. Their models are still struggling – and mostly failing – to cope with disruptive change, and with the fact that both balance sheets and inequality matter.

Read Here – Project Syndicate

Stories That Can’t End Well

After almost a century in which economic policymaking was the preserve of technocrats and social scientists, scholars from narrative-based disciplines have begun to feature prominently in policy debates. But by using partial knowledge to advance specific policy prescriptions, they have become even more dangerous than economists.

Read Here – Project Syndicate

The End Of Economics?

In the three decades since the end of the Cold War, economics has enjoyed a kind of intellectual hegemony. In the three decades since the end of the Cold War, economics has enjoyed a kind of intellectual hegemony. It has become first among equals in the social sciences and has dominated most policy agendas as well. Economists have been much sought after by businesses, governments, and society at large, their insights seen as useful in every sphere of life…That hegemony is now over.

Read Here – Foreign Policy

Why The U.S. Economy Is Having A Boom

Why is this boom happening? That’s an almost impossible question to answer. Fundamentally, economists don’t know why booms happen. It’s possible that there’s not even such a thing as a “boom” at all — that this is just how the economy works under normal circumstances, when there isn’t a recession or crisis to throw it off its game.

Read Here – Bloomberg

What Is Human Capital?

Friedman had discovered in human capital theory more than just a means for boosting economic growth. The very way it conceptualised human beings was an ideological weapon too, especially when it came to counteracting the labour-centric discourse of communism, both outside and inside the US.

Read Here – Aeon

Will China And India Always Be Poorer? Probably Not

Since 1950, middle-income countries have nearly always grown faster than expected. Looking just at the past decade and a half, current middle-income countries that had an average gross national income of $2,381 in 2000 have seen that more than double, to $4,951 in 2015. U.S. income, in contrast, climbed just 15 percent over the same period.

Read Here – Ozy

Economists Versus The Economy

Today’s professional economists, by contrast, have studied almost nothing but economics. They don’t even read the classics of their own discipline. Economic history comes, if at all, from data sets. Philosophy, which could teach them about the limits of the economic method, is a closed book. Mathematics, demanding and seductive, has monopolized their mental horizons. The economists are the idiots savants of our time.

Read Here – Project Syndicate

What Is Wrong With The West’s Economies?

Many of us in Western Europe and America feel that our economies are far from just, though our views on justice differ somewhat. One band of economists, led for decades by the British economist Anthony Atkinson, sees the West as being in another Gilded Age of inequality in income and wealth.1 Adopting Jeremy Bentham’s utilitarian view, they would redistribute income from those in high brackets to those farther down—until we reach the highest “sum of utilities.” It is a question, though, whether this doctrine captures intuitive views of what is just.

Read Here – London Review of Books

When The Predictions Turned Out Right

An evergreen joke among speakers at the World Economic Forum’s annual meeting in Davos warns against making predictions. Whatever you say, the punchline goes, will be proven wrong.

Read Here – BusinessWeek

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