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looking beyond borders

foreign policy and global economy

Archive for the tag “Economy”

How Modi Turned The Gulf To His Favour

Indian Prime Minister, Narendra Modi meeting the Crown Prince of the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia Prince Mohammed Bin Salman Bin Abdulaziz Al-Saud on the sidelines of the G-20 Summit, in Osaka. Photo/PIB

So why did the Islamic powers in the Gulf embrace Modi over the past five years despite presumptions suggesting otherwise? The answer lies more within the interests of the Gulf nations itself than Modi government’s outreach, which however successfully lassoed in the interest of these cash-rich states looking towards the Indian economy to secure their own future financial interests, as regional behemoths such as Saudi Arabia start their attempts to shake-off a decades long addiction to the petro-dollar.

Read Here – ORFOnline

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The “Digital Revolution” Of Wellbeing

The rise of digital platforms, cutting-edge forms of automation, and Big Data promises to transform labor markets and upend longstanding business models. It will also broaden our thinking about human wellbeing, much of which hinges on social and experiential factors that have little to do with standard measures of material welfare.

Read Here – Project Syndicate

How The Kremlin Sees The Rest Of The World

Much of the Kremlin’s self-confidence stems from the belief that the Western world is changing in ways that suit Russia. Donald Trump is seen to represent a long-term trend in the US rather than a short-term blip: Russian analysts reckon that the US will be less focused on intervening around the world to uphold a liberal, rules-based, US-led order, and that it will be more nationalist, mercantilist and interest-focused. So in the long run, the US and Russia should be able to accommodate each other.

Read Here – The New Statesman

Re-made In China

In reality, China’s longstanding suspicion of foreign influence has not prevented the government or the people from becoming remarkably adept at marshalling the flow of overseas cultural touchstones into the country’s borders, remoulding them into something that isn’t entirely Chinese, but is also totally different from its original form.

Read Here – Aeon

Enter Boris: What His Premiership Will Look Like

Quietly and discreetly, the planning for Boris Johnson’s premiership has begun. No one wants to be seen measuring the curtains, but his team are confident he’ll be the choice of Tory party members. It would be the most spectacular upset if he is not. Boris has fixed a Brexit deadline — 31 October — and time is short so his aides are concentrating on what to do when — if — he makes it to No. 10.

Read Here – The Spectator

Why US-China Cold War Would Be So Costly

If the U.S.-China trade war develops into a broader cold war, as some observers fear, it will be nothing like the actual Cold War. Between civil war in Russia after World War I, the Great Depression in the United States and then the cataclysm of World War II, America and the Soviet Union never had a chance to develop a significant economic relationship before things hardened into a stark East-West divide. When Washington adopted a containment strategy that blocked most trade with the Soviets, including technology transfers, it had relatively little impact on either economy. The situation with China today is radically different.

Read Here – World Politics Review

As Trade War Continues, Are The US And Chinese Economies Heading For A Messy Divorce?

The decoupling of investment is already clear. Last year, Chinese acquisitions of American companies plunged 95 per cent from its peak in 2017 after the US Congress gave the Committee on Foreign Investment in the US authority to broaden the scope of its reviews of Chinese acquisitions on national security grounds.

Read Here – South China Morning Post

The Edge That Indian Companies Could Wield In Africa

Indian companies have a head-start in translating those growth trends into profitable, sustainable enterprises. From deep experience in their home market, they know how to overcome the challenges that limit markets and make life harder for ordinary people. Africa should be high on the agenda of Indian companies targeting global growth. Their innovations and investments can create both outsize returns and real social impact.

Read Here – Mint

How Wall Street Became A Cult Of Risk

Policymakers need to ask what Wall Street’s mighty money machine exists for in the first place. Should the financial business exist primarily as an end in itself, or should it be, as in the original meaning of “finance,” a means to an end? …When finance becomes an end in itself, the public is liable to get angry. That’s one reason for the wave of populism that has washed over the globe since the crisis.

Read Here – Foreign Affairs

Hong Kong’s Protests Show the Biggest Challenge to China’s Rise Is At Home

The biggest challenges to the brittle present system in China don’t come from outsiders concocting destabilizing plots in an imaginary, inimical West, but from Chinese people themselves, which is precisely what the people of Hong Kong are, as Beijing itself has always insisted. Once they get a whiff of them, people everywhere, it turns out, like freedoms of speech and association and the right to fair and impartial justice, and having a more or less direct say in the choice of their leaders.

Read Here – World Politics Review

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