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looking beyond borders

foreign policy and global economy

Archive for the tag “education”

Have China’s Value Propositions Become More Attractive Than America’s?

For decades, the United States was better than any other nation in putting forth value propositions that made other countries want to broaden and deepen their ties and associations with it. These were so effective that even when other governments wished to keep America at arm’s length, their people continued to feel an irresistible attraction. That is changing with dizzying speed now.

Read Here – World Politics Review

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China’s Long Arm Reaches Into American Campuses

When Chinese President Xi Jinping visited Washington on Sept. 24, 2015 on a state visit, hundreds of Chinese students lined the streets for hours, carrying banners and flags to welcome him. It was a remarkable display of seemingly spontaneous patriotism. Except it wasn’t entirely spontaneous. The Chinese Embassy paid students to attend and helped organise the event.

Read Here – Foreign Policy

How China Infiltrated U.S. Classrooms

More than a decade after they were created, Confucius Institutes have sprouted up at more than 500 college campuses worldwide, with more than 100 of them in the United States—including at The George Washington University, the University of Michigan and the University of Iowa. Overseen by a branch of the Chinese Ministry of Education known colloquially as Hanban, the institutes are part of a broader propaganda initiative that the Chinese government is pumping an estimated $10 billion into annually, and they have only been bolstered by growing interest in China among American college students.

Read Here – Politico

Why Australia’s Cure For Chinese Influence Is Worse Than The Disease

Over the past year, Chinese Australians who form the largest overseas Chinese community in Oceania, have found themselves at the centre of unwanted attention and scrutiny from the Australian government, intelligence services and media. In what appeared a concerted campaign, some of the community’s prominent business leaders were accused of acting as possible agents of the Chinese government by seeking, at its behest, to influence Australia’s domestic politics through political donations.

Read Here – South China Morning Post

Pakistan’s Unrealised Demographic Dividend Could Add To Its Problems

Apart from structural imbalances, the inability of Pakistan’s economy to absorb the growing working-age population is due to the snowballing effect of insufficient investment in education over decades. This weakness has manifested itself when an educated work force is needed the most in order to reap the demographic dividend.

Read Here – The Indian Express

The Nation Obama Built

Courtesy: White House website official photo

Courtesy: White House website official photo

Over the past seven years, Americans have heard an awful lot about Barack Obama and his presidency, but the actual substance of his domestic policies and their impact on the country remain poorly understood. He has engineered quite a few quiet revolutions—and some of his louder revolutions are shaking up the status quo in quiet ways.

Read Here – Politico

Lowering World Poverty Depends On India

The future of global inequality, in other words, rests on India’s shoulders. To join the global middle class, India must do much better. It must improve infrastructure and education. It must implement good governance and reduce harmful corruption. It must attract foreign investment and make growth a priority. And it must do all this while limiting its use of coal, in order to help halt the danger from global warming.

Read Here – Bloomberg View

This Is How China-U.S. Ties Pan Out…

– People’s Daily Online

Airbrushing Colonial History

For better or for worse, the British empire was the most important thing the British ever did. It altered the course of history across the globe and shaped the modern world. It also led to the huge enrichment of Britain, just as, conversely, it led to the impoverishment of much of the rest of the non-European world. India and China, which until then had dominated global manufacturing, were two of the biggest losers in this story, along with hundreds of thousands of enslaved sub-Saharan Africans sent off on the middle passage to work in the plantations.

Read Here – The Guardian

Xi urges Promoting Economic, Social Development In Tibet

Chinese President Xi Jinping has asked for more efforts to promote economic growth and all-round social progress in Tibet and Tibetan-inhabited areas in four other provinces, vowing sustainable measures and continued preferential policies.

Read Here – Global Times

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