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looking beyond borders

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Archive for the tag “espionage”

Espionage And The Catholic Church From The Cold War To The Present

The Holy See has played an important but understudied role in intelligence and diplomacy through its diplomatic service, which is one of the oldest in the world. The extensive presence of the Holy See’s diplomats combined with their neutrality provides them access to unique information in the far corners of the globe.

Read Here – WarOnTheRocks

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The Spies Who Came In From The Continent

From John le Carré’s novels to the insatiable popular interest in James Bond, Britain has long enjoyed, and cultivated, an image of producing superior spies. This reputation is based on more than myth. For decades during and following World War II, the painstaking real-world work of British intelligence officers was one of the United Kingdom’s primary sources of power.

Read Here – Foreign Policy

When China Rules The Web

For almost five decades, the United States has guided the growth of the Internet. From its origins as a small Pentagon program to its status as a global platform that connects more than half of the world’s population and tens of billions of devices, the Internet has long been an American project. Yet today, the United States has ceded leadership in cyberspace to China.

Read Here – Foreign Affairs

How Silicon Valley Became A Den Of Spies

Foreign spies have been showing up uninvited to San Francisco and Silicon Valley for a very long time. According to former U.S. intelligence officials, that’s true today more than ever. In fact, they warn—especially because of increasing Russian and Chinese aggressiveness, and the local concentration of world-leading science and technology firms—there’s a full-on epidemic of espionage on the West Coast right now.

Read Here – Politico

Australia’s Fight Against Chinese Political Interference

Last December, while introducing legislation to outlaw foreign interference in Australian politics, Prime Minister Malcolm Turnbull told the Australian Parliament that the scale of the threat to Australian democracy and sovereignty from foreign influence campaigns was “unprecedented.” Turnbull did not name any country in particular, but the proposed laws were clearly aimed primarily at Chinese covert interference.

Read Here – Foreign Affairs

What The CIA’s Tech Director Wants From Artificial Intelligence

Should the U.S. fear growing Russian progress in artificial intelligence? Last week, Vladimir Putin  told students, “Whoever becomes the leader in this sphere will become the ruler of the world.” That caught the interest of noted AI phobe profiteer Elon Musk who tweeted, simply and ominously: “It begins…”

Read Here – Defense One

When A Foreign Government Interfered In A U.S. Election — To Reelect FDR

Covert intelligence operations, propaganda, fake news stories, dirty tricks—all were used in a foreign government’s audacious attempt to influence U.S. elections. It wasn’t 2016; it was 1940, and the operations were employed not by a hostile adversary, but by America’s closest ally, the United Kingdom.

Read Here – Politico

Russia, China, And Cyber Espionage

Cyber operations are also an essentially asymmetric tool, in that they level the playing field between nations that may have wide disparities in terms of the effectiveness of their conventional forces. However, this cuts both ways, as the United States also conducts a considerable number of cyber operations in support of intelligence collection. This leads into the third primary advantage of cyber as it relates to espionage, which is that cyber-capabilities make exfiltrating large volumes of information much, much easier than would be the case otherwise.

Read Here – The Cipher Brief

A Dangerous Game: Responding To Chinese Cyber Activities

Is it necessary for the United States to find a way to deal with Chinese criminal activity in cyberspace? Absolutely. But, this is a very dangerous game. It is important that the United States have no illusions about what it is getting itself into. Some have suggested that punishing China for its unwillingness to adhere to international norms will encourage China to get in line and follow the rules. Considering Chinese culture and past Chinese reactions, this is highly unlikely.

Read Here – The Diplomat

The New Normal: China’s Risky Intelligence Operations

China’s widespread theft of information in cyberspace probably has done more to poison the well of U.S.-China relations than almost anything else. The possibility of any meaningful fallout from such operations seems remote from the concerns of Chinese leaders, even as Washington considers more aggressive responses to cyber intrusions.

Read Here – The National Interest

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