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looking beyond borders

foreign policy and global economy

Archive for the tag “Eurasia”

Wanted: A U.S. Strategic Response to China’s Belt And Road Initiative

China is engaging in a nearly trillion dollar play for the future of Afro-Eurasia—called the Belt and Road Initiative—and has so far caught the United States flat-footed. Unless the United States works with key allies and partners to craft a forward-leaning response, it risks replicating the strategic failure that occurred in the South China Sea. The result could be a China-centric economic and security order extending across Eurasia and along the Indian Ocean rim.

Read Here – The National Interest

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The Return Of Marco Polo’s World And The U.S. Military Response

As Europe disappears, Eurasia coheres. The supercontinent is becoming one fluid, comprehensible unit of trade and conflict, as the Westphalian system of states weakens and older, imperial legacies – Russian, Chinese, Iranian, Turkish – become paramount. Every crisis from Central Europe to the ethnic-Han Chinese heartland is now interlinked. There is one singular battlespace.

Read Here – cnas.org

Also Read:

An Essay Response to Marco Polo’s World

Connectivity and Strategy: A Response to Robert Kaplan

India: One State, Many Countries

As the rest of Eurasia slides further into crisis, the only thing getting in India’s way is India.

Read Here – Geopolitical Futures

Geoeconomics In Central Asia

Twenty-five years after the dissolution of the Soviet Union, Central Asia is a region of relative stability. There are, of course, security, economic, and social challenges, which give local leaders sleepless nights; however, the narrative shift – from a troublesome region to an area of opportunity – is producing some surprising results.

Read Here – The Diplomat

Four Big Foreign Policy Challenges Indian Premier Needs A Framework To Deal With

The last time we saw such an extensive shift in the global situation was probably between 1989 and 1992, when the Narasimha Rao government came to power and India adjusted her policies considerably. Today the global economic balance has already shifted, and local balances of power are shifting rapidly, even if the overall global military balance is still primarily in favour of the West.

Read Here – The Wire

A New Great Game Is Afoot and India Must Join The Play

In deciding to visit all the Central Asian Republics (CARs) together, which none of his predecessors has done, Prime Minister Modi hopefully intends to take a holistic view of India’s relations with Central Asia. It is imperative that, beyond the usual bilateral discussions and agreements, he views the region from a strategic perspective, taking into account developments in the wider Eurasian space.

Read Here – The Wire

Unequal Partners: China And Russia In Eurasia

Recent strategic shifts by China and Russia simultaneously – and paradoxically – mark closer ties, challenges to the U.S., an unequal partnership, and rivalry between them in Eurasia.

Read Here – The Diplomat

Pyongyang-Tehran Military Ties Test Nuclear Nonproliferation Regime

Although North Korea and Iran are thousands of kilometers apart on opposite sides of Eurasia, they are linked — directly as well as indirectly — in the North Korean crisis. Iran’s nuclear and long-range ballistic missile ambitions are silent actors in the confrontation between North Korea and a wide range of countries in the international community, including the United States, China and Russia.

Read Here – Japan Times

Iran, India, Afghanistan, Pakistan, China And The US Are All Scrambling To Get The Upper Hand Across Eurasia.

In the complex chessboard where the New Great Game in Eurasia is being played, both Kings are easy to identify: Pipelineistan, and the possible, multiple intersections of a 21st century Silk Road.  Few have noticed a crucial meeting that took place during the recent Non-Aligned Movement (NAM) summit in Tehran, between senior Foreign Ministry diplomats from Afghanistan, India and Iran. Their ultimate goal; a new Southern Silk Road connecting Iran to Central and South Asia through roads, railways and last but not least, major ports.

The crucial Silk Road port in this case is Chabahar, in Sistan-Balochistan province in southeast Iran. Tehran has already invested $340 million to complete 70 per cent of the port construction – a decade-long project. But with US and EU sanctions biting harder and harder, Tehran expects Delhi to come up with a closing $100 million. India has already invested $136 million to link Chabahar to Afghanistan’s ring road system.

Read Here – Ajazeera

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