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Archive for the tag “Europe”

Europe ‘Pushed Off Beijing’s Radar’ In China’s Drive To Seal US Trade Deal

China’s all-consuming focus on sealing a US trade deal forced its top trade negotiator to cancel a trip to Brussels, raising the risk of Europe being pushed “off a cliff”, according to the head of a leading European business group in Beijing.

Read Here – South China Morning Post

EU Agrees Brexit Extension To 31 January

The EU has agreed to a Brexit extension to 31 January 2020, with the option for the UK to leave earlier if a deal is ratified, clearing the way for opposition parties to back a general election. After a 30-minute meeting of European ambassadors, Donald Tusk, the president of the European council, said the EU27 had agreed to the request made by Boris Johnson just over a week ago.

Read Here – The Guardian

Boris Johnson’s Do-Or-Die Gamble On Brexit

The primary difference between the deals produced by May and Johnson revolve around the Irish question. Northern Ireland, as part of the United Kingdom, would be part of any withdrawal process. Currently, there are no customs posts or physical checkmarks between Northern Ireland and the Republic of Ireland. This is partially because they’re in the same customs union under the European Single Market, and also because of the Good Friday Agreement of 1999, which put an end to The Troubles.

Read Here – The National Interest

The Population Bust

For most of human history, the world’s population grew so slowly that for most people alive, it would have felt static. Between the year 1 and 1700, the human population went from about 200 million to about 600 million; by 1800, it had barely hit one billion. Then, the population exploded, first in the United Kingdom and the United States, next in much of the rest of Europe, and eventually in Asia.

Read Here – Foreign Affairs

Who Will Win The Twenty-First Century?

For years, Europeans were lulled into thinking that the peace and prosperity of the immediate post-Cold War period would be self-sustaining. But, two decades into the twenty-first century, it is clear that the Old Continent miscalculated and now must catch up to the digital revolution.

Read Here – Project Syndicate

Why Europe Can’t Stop Laughing At Boris Johnson

Across the Continent, the reaction to his ascension to the U.K.’s highest political office has been marked more by gallows humour than genuine concern about what his tenure might bring. From Brussels to Berlin, everyone seems to have a personal “best of Boris” list.

Read Here – Politico

Also Read – Boris Johnson Promises To Take ‘Personal Responsibility’ For Delivering Brexit In First Speech As PM

The Post-Brexit Paradox Of ‘Global Britain’

Brexit is an all-consuming maelstrom of political dysfunction, one that has compelled Britain’s eyes inward. Yet amid the chaos, Prime Minister Theresa May has been steadfast in her determination that the country’s international role should not succumb to the same myopic fate as its departure from the European Union has.

Read Here – The Atlantic

China’s Flexible Belt And Road Approach Leads To Ambiguity

A red carpet, gala dinner and a greeting at the presidential palace by guards on horseback – a privilege usually reserved for monarchs and popes – marked Chinese President Xi Jinping’s arrival in Italy last month for a landmark moment in his signature project to revitalise the ancient Silk Road.

Read Here – South China Morning Post

How To Make The Most Of China’s Accidental Rise As A European Power

Brussels has misread Beijing’s global aspirations – there is no grand plan behind Chinese acquisitions of European assets. But, as China becomes a stakeholder in Europe, the continent should adopt a pragmatic strategy to profit from this.

Read Here – South China Morning Post

America’s Polarisation Is A Foreign Policy Problem, Too

…there’s no question that the United States is at a level of political polarization unseen for many decades. Most of the attention to this phenomenon has focused on its effects on America’s internal politics, and some observers are clearly worried that the core institutions of the country might be at risk—understandable, given President Donald Trump’s open hostility towards some of these institutions, his apparent fondness for authoritarians, and the emergence of something resembling “state media” (i.e., Fox News).

Read Here – Foreign Policy

Also Read: Perils Of Polarization For ~U.S. Foreign Policy

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