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looking beyond borders

foreign policy and global economy

Archive for the tag “european union”

Inside The Chaos Surrounding Britain’s Brexit Boondoggle

Britain’s departure from the European Union and the forging of a new cross-Channel relationship was supposed to be one of the “easiest” deals “in human history.” It has, instead, turned out to be a national nightmare and an international embarrassment.

Read Here – The National Interest

Also read: The Brexit Wreckers

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Donald Trump’s Real Foreign Policy Has Arrived

Does Trump indeed mark the end of an era? Or will he prove a transitory figure who created a mere interregnum in America’s quest for primacy after the Cold War? In speaking about America’s purpose, Trump himself has repeatedly made it clear that he seeks to overturn what he regards as the benighted policies of the past. In contrast to his predecessors, Trump has repeatedly disparaged the notion that America is uniquely virtuous.

Read Hew – National Interest

The EU Can’t Avoid U.S. Sanctions On Iran

At first shrill and chaotic, Europe’s outrage at Trump’s take-no-prisoners Iran policy has now found a bold and practical course of action. A core group of creative European civil servants has devised several economic mechanisms meant to demonstrate the EU’s continued support for the nuclear deal, deliver Iran its economic benefits, and assert Europe’s ability to take its own policy path.

Read Here – Foreign Affairs

Brexit: Eighteen Of The World’s Leading Experts On What Happens Next

Where do Britain and the EU go from here on Brexit? Can and should Britain stay in the EU (from a legal, political, public opinion, or another standpoint) or is separation best? Should Britons get another vote on Brexit or on the final deal? What will Britain’s future relationship with the EU look like, and what kind of an effect will it have on Britain’s economy?

Read Here – The National Interest

How To Resolve Europe’s Political Crisis Over Migration

Since the European Union’s migration crisis peaked in 2015, the number of illegal migrants arriving in the EU has fallen by 95%. Migration challenges remain, and reform of the EU’s methods for managing immigration is desperately needed, as the recent scandalous treatment of the Aquarius rescue vessel, which Italy and Malta turned away, made all too clear. But the timing of the immigration talks held by European leaders in Brussels last month was more a reflection of domestic political crises than a response to a spike in new arrivals.

Read Here – Project Syndicate

The Transatlantic Rupture

In the past, Europeans often diminished the value of geography, which would have demanded a closer relationship with Russia, in favour of the geography of values, which justified a transatlantic orientation. When the US is led by an administration that is betraying those values, however, that argument no longer applies.

Read Here – Project Syndicate

America’s Allies Should Stand Up To Its Reckless Trade Policy

Mr Trump’s goals go far beyond tariffs on a few metals. He seeks trade terms that will force supply chains to move to America, damn the economic consequences. For example, the administration wants the North American Free-Trade Agreement (NAFTA) to expire automatically after five years, robbing firms of the certainty they need to invest in Mexico. To roll over on tariffs today would invite further, more damaging assaults tomorrow.

Read Here – The Economist

Trump’s Art of Unpredictability Starts to Backfire Overseas

As a businessman, U.S. President Donald Trump saw strength in his willingness to keep multiple balls in the air and change approach as they fell. In international relations, that unpredictability may be proving a liability.

Read Here – Bloomberg

The Iran Deal Was Bad, But Leaving It Was Worse

The damage from withdrawing from the JCPOA is also increased by Trump’s abandonment of the serious effort to develop a common position between the U.S. and its European allies on the so called “sunset clause.” That clause would have allowed Iran to regain it’s so called “inalienable rights” to scale up its worrisome nuclear activities within a few years and therefore needed addressing.

Read Here – The National Interest

The Complicated Geopolitics Of U.S. Oil Sanctions On Iran

It is often said, perhaps with some hyperbole, that Iran’s nuclear deal with world powers was the best hope for conflict resolution in the Middle East. Its architect John Kerry argues instead that the 2015 deal’s limited parameter of closing Iran’s pathway to a nuclear weapon is sufficient on the merits.

Read Here – CFR

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