looking beyond borders

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Archive for the tag “exports”

One Of The World’s Happiest Economic Stories Comes From South Asia, But Not India

Bangladesh’s population of 160 million is as big as France, Germany, and the Netherlands combined. The country is also easily the poorest of the world’s 10 most populous. Given its size and the depth of its poverty, the country’s recent economic boom must rank as one of the world’s happiest economic stories right now.

Read Here – Quartz

America Owes China $1 trillion. That’s A Problem For Beijing, And Trump Knows It

Indeed, the US-China relationship is a classic example of the old saw: if you owe the bank a thousand dollars, you have a problem; if you owe the bank a trillion dollars, the bank has a problem. Trump holds the important cards and it is simply a case of whether he wants to play them.

Read Here – The Guardian

How China Fell Off The Miracle Path

For years now, Donald J. Trump has been sounding the alarm on China, calling it an economic bully that has been “eating our lunch.” The crux of Mr. Trump’s attack is that Beijing manipulates its currency to keep it cheap and give Chinese exports an unfair advantage. But that narrative is so last decade. China is now a threat to the United States not because it is strong but because it is fragile.

Read Here – The New York Times

Lessons For Pakistan: Make Things People Will Buy

PRIME MINISTER Nawaz Sharif has declared developing Pakistan’s external economy a national priority. He should be applauded for focusing on tackling a major weakness. However, Pakistan’s interest in trade is not new, and is a case study in lost opportunities.

Read Here – Dawn

Xi Says China Will Not Experience A ‘Hard Landing’

China will continue to grow at a sustainable rate, and will not experience a hard landing, Chinese President Xi Jinping said in London. “China will not close the door it has opened. We are working to build a new system of an open economy and we will make renewed effort to make an open world economy”. In the next five years China is expected to import more than $10 trillion of goods, have more than $500 billion of overseas investment, and more than 500 million Chinese tourists will be expected to travel abroad, which presented enormous business opportunities, he said.

Read Here – China Daily

TPP Trade Deal: Who Stands To Gain, Suffer In Asia-Pacific

The Trans-Pacific Partnership is the biggest trade agreement in history, reducing tariffs and other forms of protectionism in a dozen countries making up about 40 percent of the global economy with economic output of almost $30 trillion. The White House estimates it will eliminate 18,000 tariffs on U.S.-manufactured goods, while giving everyone from Vietnamese shrimpers to New Zealand dairy farmers cheaper access to markets across the Pacific.

Read Here – Bloomberg

Bangladesh: The Real Winner In The Iran Nuclear Deal?

As the world comes to terms with the Iran nuclear deal, there has been plentiful analysis on its impact across the world. The focus largely has been on the impact in the Middle East. Its impact on the Indian subcontinent has also been researched and commented upon, with a specific focus on how India and Pakistan may benefit. However, little has been said about the nuclear deal’s impact on Bangladesh.

Read Here – The National Interest

Revealed: The Great Chinese Economic Transition Is Here

If China is indeed making the transition it has long said it wishes to make, it would look like what we are now seeing. Both the IMF and the World Bank have in recent months pointed to compelling evidence that the transition is well under way, and it’s one of which they heartily approve. It’s remarkable that last year consumption growth in China contributed more to GDP growth than did the growth of investment. Remarkable, too, that half of the overall growth of output was contributed by services rather than by heavy industry.

Read Here – The National Interest

Americans Buy A Fifth Of China’s Exports

Americans bought almost $1 out of every $5 worth of goods that China exported in May, the highest share since August 2010. While Chinese shipments to trading partners including Japan, Europe and South Korea tumbled last month from a year ago, those to the U.S. climbed 7.8 percent. That helped make America the destination for 18.8 percent of China’s exports, outstripping all others.

Read Here – Bloomberg

11 Numbers Showing India Has A Long Way to Go To Become The Next China

Read Here – The Wall Street Journal

5 Gaps That Define India-China Relationship

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