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Archive for the tag “Fidel Castro”

‘My Dearest Fidel’: An ABC Journalist’s Secret Liaison With Fidel Castro

Howard’s trip to Havana in the winter of 1964 was pivotal in advancing one of the most unusual and consequential partnerships in the history of U.S.-Cuban relations. She became Castro’s leading American confidant, as well as his covert interlocutor with the White House—the key link in a top-secret back channel she singlehandedly established between Washington and Havana to explore the possibility of rapprochement in the aftermath of the Cuban missile crisis.

Read Here – Politico

Castro’s Legacy: How The Revolutionary Inspired And Appalled The World

932042-fidel-castroNo street bears his name and there is not a single statue in his honour but Fidel Castro did not want or need that type of recognition. From tip to tip, he made Cuba his living, breathing creation.

Read Here – The Guardian

The Long, Hard Drive To Havana

The face-to-face conversation between President Obama and his Cuban counterpart, Raul Castro, marked the most significant thaw in the two countries’ relationship in decades…However, the process of fully restoring ties will be long and difficult—if it succeeds at all.

Read Here – The Atlantic

 

The World As It Was in 2013

Silvio Berlusconi is out and Angela Merkel was reelected. Nelson Mandela and Hugo Chavez passed away. Fidel Castro didn’t. People took to the streets in Kiev and Bangkok, Cairo and Khartoum. The president of Syria ignored Barack Obama’s red line and used chemical weapons, while Iran was willing to engage in negotiations with the United States for the first time in 34 years. China elected a new leader and jailed another. North Korea’s tyrant-in-training executed his uncle.

Read Here – The Atlantic

That Handshake In South Africa

This isn’t the first time U.S. and Cuban leaders have shaken hands, but that hasn’t stopped people from getting worked up.

Read Here – The Atlantic

Kennedy And His Generals

President Kennedy faced a foe more relentless than Khrushchev, just across the Potomac: the bellicose Joint Chiefs of Staff argued for the deployment of nuclear weapons and kept pressing to invade Cuba. A presidential historian reveals that Kennedy’s success in fending them off may have been his most consequential victory.

Read Here – The Atlantic

Chavez Is Gone. Where Does This Leave Venezuela?

To be sure, Chávez’s boldness partially helped inspire pride and political self-confidence in the region, in addition to revitalizing the dream of leftist revolution in Latin America. Chávez’s contributions, however, were minimal compared with the positive impact of larger and more important factors, such as the rise of Brazil, the commodity boom, the growing assertiveness of many of the region’s countries, and the acute fiscal and political shortcomings of the United States.

Read Here – Foreign Affairs

Nightmare on Nuke Street

October is a scary month. And it’s not just Halloween. October also happens to be the anniversary of the Cuban Missile Crisis. And if the ghosts and goblins don’t make you wet your pants, the thought of Khrushchev, Kennedy, and Castro dancing on the edge of nuclear war should.

During the Cold War, the United States twice more raised the alert status of its nuclear forces — in October 1969 and October 1973And one of the worst reactor accidents at a military program — the fire at Britain’s Windscale reactor — also happened in October.

Read Here – Foreign Policy

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