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looking beyond borders

foreign policy and global economy

Archive for the tag “Foreign Policy”

Why Population Will Drive Geopolitics

Demographics may not be destiny, but for students of geopolitics, they come close. Although conventional measures of economic and military power often receive more attention, few factors influence the long-term competition between great powers as much as changes in the size, capabilities, and characteristics of national populations.

Read Here – Foreign Affairs

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The ‘Xi Doctrine’: Proclaiming And Rationalizing China’s Aggression

Empirical evidence of China’s aggression is increasingly common, from its attempt to dominate the South China Sea, the neo-imperialist effort to gain control of states through the Belt and Road Initiative, to its technological imperialism to control 5G and artificial intelligence technologies. What is rather less frequent are statements from high-level Chinese officials proclaiming the country’s intent to be aggressive and offering an attempted legitimising principle justifying that aggression.

Read Here – The National Interest

Balancing The Poles

India should be successful in resisting demands to choose one side of the fence or the other, because the fence itself will be rickety and shifting. Appropriate to the diffused geopolitical landscape is a policy which enables promotion of India’s interests through multiple circles of engagement.

Read Here – The Indian Express

Jokowi’s Global Maritime Fulcrum: 5 More Years?

Indonesian President Joko “Jokowi” Widodo is set to assume office for another half-decade, giving a sigh of relief to patrons counting on the continuity of his policies…His second term brings immediate questions over whether he will employ the same strategic frameworks in driving the country’s development, and whether the concept of the Global Maritime Fulcrum (GMF) will prevail.

Read Here – The Diplomat

Decades Of Being Wrong About China Should Teach Us Something

Today, as policy makers and commentators confidently assert that trade wars are easy to win or that hot wars with China are either impossible or inevitable, the experience of being proved wrong again and again should remind us that events will, more than likely, not turn out as predicted.

Read Here – The Atlantic

What The US-Mexico Migration Dispute Is Really About

The dispute is part of a much bigger issue. Washington is trying to keep its southern neighbour in check, and it’s trying to remind Mexico, which has been pursuing a more independent foreign policy of late, that the U.S. is the dominant power in the Western Hemisphere. The revival of the Monroe Doctrine is one of the most important processes underway in North America right now, but it’s challenged by the fact that the U.S. and Mexico have different visions for Central America.

Read Here – Geopolitical Futures

The Post-Brexit Paradox Of ‘Global Britain’

Brexit is an all-consuming maelstrom of political dysfunction, one that has compelled Britain’s eyes inward. Yet amid the chaos, Prime Minister Theresa May has been steadfast in her determination that the country’s international role should not succumb to the same myopic fate as its departure from the European Union has.

Read Here – The Atlantic

Understanding the Failure Of U.S. Foreign Policy: The Albright Doctrine

U.S. foreign policy suffers from systematic flaws in the thinking of the informal policy collective which former Obama aide Ben Rhodes dismissed as “The Blob.” Perhaps no official better articulated The Blob’s defective precepts than Madeleine Albright, United Nations ambassador and Secretary of State.

Read Here – The National Interest

Five Big Ideas For The Indian Foreign Ministry’s New Indo-Pacific Desk

As the Indo-Pacific concept becomes a more central part of India’s foreign policy, here are five ideas for this Indo-Pacific desk to consider, all of which aim to advance the shared vision of a “free, open, and inclusive Indo-Pacific” promoted by India, the United States, Japan, and others.

Read Here – The Diplomat

Questionable Alliances: Why America Needs to Reexamine Its International Relationships

Modern circumstances continue to bear out the prescience of America’s founders. Especially George Washington’s warning against “entangling alliances.” In contrast, U.S. policymakers today treat military allies like Facebook friends, the more the merrier, something to brag about. However, most of Washington’s existing alliances are harmful, expensive commitments with  little relevance to American security.

Read Here – The National Interest

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