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looking beyond borders

foreign policy and global economy

Archive for the tag “gas”

Why China Is Building A New City Out In The Desert Of Oman

Nobody is going to confuse the dusty fishing village of Duqm for Dubai. But Oman intends to change this by building an entirely new, $10.7 billion transit-oriented industrial city on the desertified coast of the Arabian Sea, 550 kilometers south of Muscat. More accurately, China intends to change this by building an entirely new $10.7 billion transit-oriented industrial city …

Read Here – Forbes

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Chinese In The Russian Far East: A Geopolitical Time Bomb?

Recent meetings between Beijing and Moscow – at the Belt and Road Forum last month and at a two-day summit last week in Russia – are the latest in a string of efforts to strengthen Sino-Russian ties, especially along the border. However, like many nations, Russia has found that working with China can be a double-edged sword.

Read Here – South China Morning Post

Major Projects Along The China–Pakistan Economic Corridor

A recently released joint report from the Chongyang Institute of Renmin University of China and Caijing Magazine shows several multi-billion-dollar projects along the China-Pakistan Economic Corridor (CPEC). Inforgraph Courtesy: Global Times.

cpec

Regional Plans

The port at Chabahar and the attendant road infrastructure being built by India, Iran and Afghanistan is not an event to turn our backs on. There is every reason for Pakistan to ask for a place on that table. The possibilities that regional cooperation open up are far too great to be sacrificed at the altar of geopolitics, writes Khurram Husain.

Read Here – Dawn

Russia’s Economic Stagnation

The Russian economy faces low growth at best and prolonged stagnation at worst. The outcome does not depend on oil prices and sanctions alone but also on more deeply rooted problems. Although some reckon that prolonged stagnation would bring Putin down, his repressive system shields him from economic mismanagement and from the costs of political adventurism, for which the Russian people are paying through lower living standards.

Read Here – National Review

The Saudis Are Stumbling; They May Take the Middle East With Them.

Saudi King Salman

Saudi King Salman

For the past eight decades Saudi Arabia has been careful. Using its vast oil wealth, it’s quietly spread its ultra-conservative brand of Islam throughout the Muslim world, secretly undermined secular regimes in its region, and prudently kept to the shadows while others did the fighting and dying. It was Saudi money that fueled the Mujahedeen in Afghanistan, underwrote Saddam Hussein’s invasion of Iran, and bankrolled Islamic movements and terrorist groups from the Caucasus to the Hindu Kush. It wasn’t a modest foreign policy, but it was a discreet one.

Read Here – The Nation

 

“Look, 20 years from now, I’m still going to be around, God willing. If Iran has a nuclear weapon, it’s my name on this.” – President Barack Obama, May 21, 2015

Obama on the Nuclear Deal – July 16, 2015

Iran-Russia Relations After Nuclear Deal

There has been a lot of speculation about how the lifting of sanctions and the re-engagement of Western companies in Iran would influence Iran’s relations with Russia. The simplistic view is that a resurgent Iran would compete with Russia as a major exporter of oil and gas, hence compelling Moscow to stand in the way of Iran developing its oil and gas potential. However, the reality is more complex and any projection of Tehran-Moscow ties will need to take into account the larger picture, especially the role that Iran can play in Moscow’s emerging strategy to focus more intensely on Asia.

Read Here – Al Monitor

Iran And Obama’s Challenges At Home

The conclusion of a nuclear agreement with Iran, should it happen, will mark only the start of negotiations at home for the White House as it has begun the offensive to sell the deal to a cynical Congress.

Read Here – The Irish Times

Geoeconomics In Central Asia

Twenty-five years after the dissolution of the Soviet Union, Central Asia is a region of relative stability. There are, of course, security, economic, and social challenges, which give local leaders sleepless nights; however, the narrative shift – from a troublesome region to an area of opportunity – is producing some surprising results.

Read Here – The Diplomat

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