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looking beyond borders

foreign policy and global economy

Archive for the tag “Gaza”

Israel’s Costly Neglect

For years, the U.S.-led peace process has focussed its energies on the roughly 40 percent of the West Bank in which the PA operates, while basically ignoring Gaza and East Jerusalem—the former because it was ruled by Hamas, an officially designated foreign terrorist organisation, and the latter because of its sensitivity to Israel. In the meantime, both areas have become regular flash points of Palestinian unrest.

Read Here – Foreign Affairs

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The Evolution Of Hamas

Hamas’ dilemma, much like the one Fatah faced in the 1990s, centers on a fundamental question: What happens when a resistance movement stops resisting and starts governing? Hamas has had almost a decade to answer this question, and in October 2016 it came very close.

Read Here – Foreign Affairs

Hamas leader Mesha’al back in spotlight

The re-election of Khalid Mesha’al, the “relative pragmatist” leader of the Gaza-based Palestinian faction Hamas, is very likely to raise hope that the two most prominent Palestinian political groups may shortly join forces, now that the chances of peace talks between the Palestinians and the Israelis could be at their doorstep.

Read Here – Gulf News

Why India Is Reluctant To Host Israeli President Shimon Peres

The IndiaIsrael friendship has been flying very well under the radar for years, arguably to the benefit of both sides. But Israel now wants a public acknowledgement of the bond. It would like India to invite President Shimon Peres for a visit to put a seal on the relationship and take it to a higher level.

India is reluctant for reasons that have more to do with history than the present and even less the future. Israelis understand the compulsions but they feel India continues to hide behind old excuses, some of which, they feel, are no longer valid.

 

Read Here – FirstPost

 

Ehud Barak’s departure leaves an enormous hole in Israeli politics

The announcement in the New York Times that Ehud Barak, the Israeli defence minister and former prime minister, is retiring from politics is a serious blow to anyone who wants to see the Jewish state take a rational and reasonable approach to global security issues.

From his time as an officer in Israel’s elite Sayeret Matkal special forces unit – during which he took part in a number of highly dangerous operations – Barak has been a a pillar of Israel’s defence establishment, and has played a leading role in shaping the direction of Israel’s defence policy.

Although a long-standing member of the Labour party, Barak has nevertheless adopted a hawkish position on security issues, and was played a leading role in the recent operation against Hamas militants in Gaza who were threatening southern Israel with their stockpiles of Iranian-made missiles.

Can five leaders make the Gaza cease-fire last?

The diplomatic activities under the current Gaza cease-fire will test whether a quintet of leaders — each with his own domestic critics — can find a peaceful rather than a military solution to solve the Palestinian situation.

The cease-fire language was direct but ambiguous: “Israel should stop all hostilities in the Gaza Strip by land, sea and air, including incursions and targeting of individuals.” Does that mean no Israeli drones over Gaza? “All Palestinian factions shall stop all hostilities from the Gaza Strip against Israel including rocket attacks and all attacks along the border.”

Read Here – Washington Post

Chapatte in IHT

Is Israel’s Gaza Campaign Laying The Groundwork For An Attack On Iran?

A close observation of the recent developments in Gaza might reveal broader implications for the region: Israel‘s operation Amud Anan (“Pillar of Cloud”) in Gaza could be preparation for an Israeli strike on Iran.

The story begins late October when a mysterious blast destroyed the Sudanese military base Yarmouk on the outskirts of the capital, Khartoum. The Yarmouk was a base camp to receive arms shipments from Iran and stolen weapons from Libya that were smuggled continentally to Hamas and the Iranian terror proxy in Gaza, Islamic Jihad. The Sudanese authorities hurried to accuse Israel, which remained silent. Satellite images of the site indicate that the bombing of Yarmouk was executed from the air. As The Atlantic reported at the time, the Israeli Air Force (IAF) is the only one in the region with the capabilities to execute such a strike.

Read Here – The Atlantic

Who Won?

EVEN before the firing between Israel and Hamas had fully died away in the wake of the ceasefire announced on the night of November 21st, two new/old battle-fronts had opened up for Binyamin Netanyahu and his ministers. The first is over public and governmental opinion in the region; the second over the support of the Israeli voter, with elections looming on January 22nd. The issue is the same on both of them: Who won?

Mr Netanyahu, Ehud Barak, the defence minister, and Avigdor Lieberman, the foreign minister, quickly convened a press conference in Tel Aviv to proclaim victory and fulsomely congratulate the nation, themselves and each other for achieving it. No sooner were they off the region’s TV screens than Khalid Meshal, the Hamas leader, came on in Cairo, suggesting to assembled newsmen there that the three Israeli leaders looked glum, which proved, he said, that they knew they’d lost.

Read Here – The Economist

How Hamas Won the War

Why is it that Hamas — purveyor of terror, launcher of Iranian-supplied rockets, and source of “death to the Jews” tropes — is getting more attention, traction, legitimacy and support than the “good” Palestinian, the reasonable and grandfatherly Mahmoud Abbas, who has foresworn violence in favor of negotiations? Since the crisis began, President Obama seems to have talked to every other Middle Eastern leader except Abbas.

Abbas’s party is in disarray. The Islamists‘ victory in the 2006 Palestinian legislative elections, its takeover of Gaza in 2007, Fatah‘s own sense of political drift, and the absence of a credible peace process created an opening for Hamas — the religious manifestation of Palestinian nationalism. Had Yasir Arafat still been alive, Hamas would never have come as far as it has.

Read Here – Foreign Policy

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