Advertisements

looking beyond borders

foreign policy and global economy

Archive for the tag “GDP”

The Global Economy Ten Years After

Photo by Marc-Olivier Jodoin on Unsplash

In the decade since the collapse of Lehman Brothers and the start of the global financial crisis, the world economy has registered stronger growth than many realize, owing in large part to China. But in the years ahead, global economic imbalances and troubling trends in the business world will continue to pose economic as well as political risks.

Read Here – Project Syndicate

Advertisements

Lies, Damn Lies, And Chinese Statistics

Is the GDP true? Of course, it isn’t. But that isn’t really important in some ways. Almost all numbers in China are open for debate. As anyone who spends time dealing with the place knows, China is full of data and numbers, and while some may be true, that doesn’t mean the data set being described is complete.

Read Here – The Interpreter

Here’s How To Beat Fake Data About The Chinese Economy

Falsifying or padding out data has been refined to an art form among China’s local bureaucrats, since good economic growth figures not only look and feel good but are benchmarks for their career advancement.This has given rise to a popular saying that “data makes an official and an official makes data”.

Read Here – South China Morning Post

As Good As It Gets

For the first time since 2010, the world economy is outperforming most predictions, and we expect this strength to continue. Our global GDP forecast for 2018 is 4.0%, up from 3.7% in 2017 and meaningfully above consensus. The strength in global growth is broad-based across most advanced and emerging economies, says a Goldman Sachs report on the global economy.

Read Here – Global Economic Analyst/Goldman Sachs

Explaining Global Recovery Amid Political Recession

Today, the world’s major economies are experiencing a steady recovery, despite the occasional setback. To be sure, economic performance is far from reaching its full potential: depending on where one looks, one can find output gaps, excess leverage, fragile balance sheets, under-investment, and unfunded longer-term non-debt liabilities. Still, financial markets show no signs of convulsion, even as monetary stimulus is gradually withdrawn.

Read Here – Project Syndicate

Deciphering China’s Economic Resilience

The fixation on headline GDP overlooks deeper issues shaping the China growth debate. That is because the Chinese economy is in the midst of an extraordinary structural transformation – with a manufacturing-led producer model giving way to an increasingly powerful services-led consumer model.

Read Here – Project Syndicate

Global Economic Growth Remains On Track, Says IMF

Rest Assured. China Has Its Economy’s Back

The People’s Bank of China has surprised many with its tolerance for market pain as it squeezes leverage in parts of the financial system. But rest assured, China won’t clamp down so hard it endangers President Xi Jinping’s goal to keep growth above 6.5 percent, according to economists from Morgan Stanley, Mizuho Securities and Oxford Economics.

Read Here – Bloomberg

Because Of Modi Government, India Can’t Match China’s Economic Growth

Indian Prime Minister Narendra Modi with Chinese President Xi Jinping during the G20 Summit, in Hangzhou, China in 2016. Photo: Press Information Bureau

Even if India’s economy is growing faster than China, it does not mean that India has become economically as powerful as China. While India’s Gross Domestic Product (GDP) was $2.5 trillion in 2016, China’s GDP is nearly five times of that, at $11.4 trillion. That also reflects in the per capita GDP: while it is $8,260 for China, for India it is $1,718. India might overtake China in terms of population by 2022, but to overtake its per capita GDP, the Indian economy needs to grow more than 30 percent annually.

Read Here – Daily O

6 Numbers That Prove The Future Is African

By 2030 one in five people will be African. Combine the continent’s soaring population with technology, improvements in infrastructure, health and education, and Africa could be the next century’s economic growth powerhouse.

Read Here – World Economic Forum

Post Navigation

%d bloggers like this: