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looking beyond borders

foreign policy and global economy

Archive for the tag “Government”

The Mess Pakistan Is In

Pakistan today suffers from a crisis of governance. The radical right is ascendant. Institutional decay is advanced; the state’s writ is eroded. We soon go to the polls in a divisive, belligerent and to a great extent despondent environment. It is time for serious reflection and introspection.

Read Here – Dawn

Also Read: Who wants to be PM?

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How Artificial Intelligence Will Reshape The Global Order

By allowing governments to monitor, understand, and control their citizens far more closely than ever before, AI will offer authoritarian countries a plausible alternative to liberal democracy, the first since the end of the Cold War. That will spark renewed international competition between social systems.

Read Here – Foreign Affairs

Also Read: Liberal World

Zuckerberg Survived But Facebook Still Has Problems

A composed and contrite Mark Zuckerberg held up under hours of grilling by more than 40 U.S. senators — but his performance did little to mask Facebook’s growing political problems in Washington.

Read Here – Politico

Also Read: Key Moments From Mark Zuckerberg’s Senate Testimony

Nobody Knows Anything About China

As a foreigner in China, you get used to hearing the retort “You don’t know China!” spat at you by locals. It’s usually a knee-jerk reaction to some uncomfortable modern issue or in defense of one of the many historical myths children in the mainland are taught as unshakeable facts about the world. But it’s also true. We don’t know China. Nor, however, do the Chinese — not even the government.

Read Here – Foreign Policy

An Indian Nightmare

Predictions of a coming Indian golden age are typically based on two trends. The first is urbanization. Between 2010 and 2050, India’s urban population will grow by as much as 500 million—the largest projected urban population growth in world history. Historically, urbanization has been linked with rising literacy, the establishment of a middle class, economic dynamism, and increasing cosmopolitanism.

Read Here – Foreign Affairs

Strongmen Are Weaker Than They Look

When Muammar al-Qaddafi came in from the cold in the mid-2000s, the “mad dog” of the Middle East embarked upon top-down reforms that were friendly to international markets, investors, the United States, and Europe. Although he became the subject of sympathetic profiles in major Western media outlets, those articles almost never emphasised the fact that the new Qaddafi continued to rule Libya as the old one did — with violence.

Read Here – Foreign Policy

China’s Surveillance State Should Scare Everyone

China is racing to become the first to implement a pervasive system of algorithmic surveillance. Harnessing advances in artificial intelligence and data mining and storage to construct detailed profiles on all citizens, China’s communist party-state is developing a “citizen score” to incentivize “good” behavior. A vast accompanying network of surveillance cameras will constantly monitor citizens’ movements, purportedly to reduce crime and terrorism. While the expanding Orwellian eye may improve “public safety,” it poses a chilling new threat to civil liberties in a country that already has one of the most oppressive and controlling governments in the world.

Read Here – The Atlantic

The International Incidents Sparked by Trump’s Twitter Feed In 2017

The more spontaneous interactions a president has, the greater the chances for the dreaded gaffe, which is why the president’s Twitter feed has been known to cause heartburn among U.S. national-security professionals. Trump relies not just on national-security and media-relations teams to craft anodyne public statements, but also on his ability to communicate directly with the world via the internet.

Read Here – The Atlantic

The Path To Power In China

The 19th Party Congress will select about 200 people to run China for the next five years, from army generals to executives from China’s biggest state-run conglomerates. A week of pageantry culminates when President Xi Jinping and the handful of other leaders on the all-powerful Politburo Standing Committee walk onto a red-carpeted stage to present themselves to the world…China’s process for choosing top leaders is opaque, but not unpredictable. There are patterns in who rises and falls at the Communist Party’s twice-a-decade reshuffle like the one that begins Oct. 18 in Beijing.

Read Here – Bloomberg

America’s Government Is Getting Old

The U.S. just elected the oldest new president in history, and Congress, too, has been getting consistently older, with its average age now up around 60. But the vast majority of the government consists of the 2 million-strong federal civilian workforce. And thanks to slow-moving hiring practices and a huge cohort of baby boomers who haven’t retired at the predicted rates, it has grown significantly older than the American workforce overall. Today, just 17 percent of federal workers are under 35 years old. (In the private sector, almost 40 percent are.) And more than a quarter of federal employees are now older than 55.

Read Here – Politico

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