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Archive for the tag “Gwadar”

Gwadar, Chabahar And Dubai

By far, Gwadar is a decade ahead of Chabahar in terms of development and higher brand recognition among the maritime industry. Iran’s belligerent security posturing and interventionist policies of harbouring non-state actors in Muslim countries constantly put her at the risk of war as well as sanctions. Chabahar is and continues to be a fishing port and does not match Gwadar, which is a natural harbour and the deepest in Asia, with little need for continuous dredging.

Read Here – The Express Tribune

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How China Rules The Waves

Investments into a vast network of harbours across the globe have made Chinese port operators the world leaders. Its shipping companies carry more cargo than those of any other nation — five of the top 10 container ports in the world are in mainland China with another in Hong Kong. Its coastguard has the globe’s largest maritime law enforcement fleet, its navy is the world’s fastest growing among major powers and its fishing armada numbers some 200,000 seagoing vessels.

Read Here – Financial Times

Pakistan And The Hidden Costs Of The CPEC

Nobody doubts that CPEC carries tremendous promise for Pakistan. And nobody doubts that our security forces have made major sacrifices in the war on terror, as well as facing the looming threat from a belligerent India these days. But greater transparency is needed in the financing of CPEC projects. Otherwise, hidden costs of all sorts will start getting bundled into whatever recovery machinery there is, whether power tariffs of gas surcharges or whatever else.

Read Here – Dawn

China’s Economic Corridor Creating New Conflicts In Pakistan

From the northern Gilgit-Balitistan region to the western Balochistan and southern Sindh provinces, the signs of an imminent conflict between Islamabad and local groups are already emerging.

Read Here – dw.com

Booming Baluchistan: Who Benefits From These Lucrative Trade Routes?

Baluchistan—divided between the Iranian province of Sistan va Baluchestan, the parts of Afghanistan around Kandahar, Nimruz and Helmand and Pakistan’s Balochistan province—is on track to emerge as one of the most pivotal geo-economic hubs of the twenty-first century.

Read Here – The National Interest

Indian Deal With Iran Shows Commitment To Infrastructure That Will Benefit China too

What matters more is that India is now willing to make an active contribution to promoting regional infrastructure development. In this regard, China is unlikely to engage in strategic confrontation with India. It is clear that the improvement of infrastructure in Central Asia will also provide opportunities for Chinese multinational corporations, which hope to find potential overseas markets in the region.
China and India will both play a vital role in promoting infrastructure development in Asia. In fact, the two countries have begun to seek cooperation with each other in this regard via the China-proposed Asian Infrastructure Investment Bank.

Read Here – Global Times

Regional Plans

The port at Chabahar and the attendant road infrastructure being built by India, Iran and Afghanistan is not an event to turn our backs on. There is every reason for Pakistan to ask for a place on that table. The possibilities that regional cooperation open up are far too great to be sacrificed at the altar of geopolitics, writes Khurram Husain.

Read Here – Dawn

One Year On, The China-Pakistan Economic Corridor

It has just been over a year since Chinese President Xi Jinping announced the China-Pakistan Economic Corridor (CPEC) during his inaugural state visit to Pakistan in April 2015. What has been the progress of the construction of the megaproject since then?

Read Here – Eurasia Review

How China Could Become A Two-Ocean Power (Thanks to Pakistan)

China’s interest in deepening its involvement in Pakistan is nothing new. What has changed and has enabled the Chinese to intensify their focus on Pakistan, is the effective end of the West’s, and in particular the United States’, military operations in Afghanistan in 2015. Accordingly, NATO’s departure from Afghanistan has had two consequences: it has created a regional power vacuum and it has diminished America’s interest in Pakistan. And China has quickly jumped into the breach.

Read Here – The National Interest

There’s No Free Chinese Lunch…

The China-Pakistan Economic Corridor is being termed as a ‘game and fate changer’ for Pakistan. But if the past is prologue, the new projects under it may not have much of a future, and both Pakistan and China know this.

Read Here – The Hindu

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