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foreign policy and global economy

Archive for the tag “Hassan Rouhani”

Iran’s Long Economic Journey

The landslide re-election of Iran’s president, Hassan Rouhani, reflects the by now familiar pattern of continuity and change that has characterised Iran’s major elections over the last two decades. But it also stands out in one key way: Rouhani has remained popular despite pursuing painful macroeconomic stabilisation.

Read Here – Project Syndicate

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Rouhani’s Victory Is Good News For Iran, But Bad News For Trump And His Sunni Allies

The Saudis will be appalled that a (comparatively) reasonable Iranian has won a (comparatively) free election that almost none of the 50 dictators gathering to meet Trump in Riyadh would ever dare to hold

Read Here – Independent

Iran’s Rouhani Secures Second Presidential Term With Landslide Victory

Hassan Rouhani, who represented moderates and reformers in the Iranian presidential campaign, won 23.5 million (or 57 percent) of the total vote, while his closest rival, Ebrahim Raisi, received 15.7 million (38.5 percent), the Interior Ministry announced.

Read Here – Tehran Times

Iran’s Choice

On Friday, Iranians will vote for their next president. The race has essentially boiled down to a choice between a centrist and a hardline conservative—the incumbent, Hassan Rouhani, and Ibrahim Raisi, the custodian of the shrine of Imam Reza in Mashad. A clear choice appears to be emerging.

Read Here – The Atlantic

The Kingmaker In Iran’s Presidential Election

…because Khamenei personifies the establishment, it is not his endorsement that matters, but that of respected antiestablishment figures who despite their political marginalisation still have unmatched reach within Iran’s society. Currently, that person is Khatami, who has managed to make use of social media to circumvent the government’s media blackout of him dating back to 2009.

Read Here – Foreign Affairs

Ahmadinejad Retakes Spot On Iran’s Political Stage, Despite ‘Advice’

Former President Mahmoud Ahmadinejad is one of the most unique players on Iran’s political stage — an unpredictable figure who is no stranger to political U-turns. On Feb. 11, he officially announced that he would not back any candidate in the May 19 presidential elections. Yet, Ahmadinejad, who was president from 2005 until 2013, has become one of the most active campaigners — even more so than some of the candidates actually running in the race — and he is vigorously supporting his former deputy Hamid Baghaei, who announced his candidacy just days after Ahmadinejad’s announcement.

Read Here – Al Monitor

Meet The Powerful Iranian Cleric Looking To Unseat Rouhani

A new and powerful figure has joined the list of candidates among Iranian conservatives for the May presidential election: Ebrahim Raisi, a senior cleric who has gradually risen through the ranks to assume powerful positions. Born in the holy city of Mashhad in northeast Iran — home to the shrine of the eighth Shiite imam — Raisi started his career as the prosecutor general of Karaj — a city just west of the capital city, Tehran — two years after the 1979 Islamic Revolution.

Read Here – Al Monitor

How Trump Is Already Shifting Domestic Politics In Iran

As election season approaches with the May presidential vote around the corner, there will be more discussions of this sort among Iranian political factions. Through Khatami’s call for unity in the face of Trump’s threats as well as Rouhani’s defiant speech on Feb. 10, the moderates and the Reformists are in essence pushing to the fore the benefits of a national reconciliation. However, in response, the radical conservatives have far from welcomed such an initiative. I

Read Here – Al Monitor

Five Reasons Why Iran’s Rouhani May Not Win Second Term

As the faction most opposed to the government, Iran’s hard-liners have made it their goal to make Hassan Rouhani the first Iranian president not to be re-elected for a second term. In fact, this objective was sought since their loss of the executive branch back in 2013.

Read Here – Al Monitor

No Wine, No Lunch: French Message For Iran

…the Iranian insistence that no wine be placed on the table came a few days after the point, on Rouhani’s European tour, when the Italians agreed to cover up some potentially offending nude statues that he might otherwise have glimpsed at an event in the Capitoline Museums, by placing big white boxes over them. The French position seemed to be that there are limits: the Italians might box their statues, but the French were not prepared to surrender on Chablis. No carte des vins, no lunch at all.

Read Here – The New Yorker

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