looking beyond borders

foreign policy and global economy

Archive for the tag “Himalayas”

The Crisis After The Crisis: How Ladakh Will Shape India’s Competition With China

The still-unresolved Ladakh crisis has created a new strategic reality for India, marked by renewed political hostility with China, and an increased militarisation of the Line of Actual Control. This new strategic reality imposes unequal costs on India and China.

Read Here | Lowy Institute

China’s Himalayan Salami Tactics

China is applying the same strategy on the roof of the world that has driven its expansion in the South China Sea: gradual territorial encroachments followed by militarised construction. So far, this slice-by-slice approach is proving just as effective on land as it has been at sea.

Read Here | Project Syndicate

China Is Paying A High Price For Provoking India

For Xi Jinping, the COVID-19 pandemic – which has preoccupied the world’s governments for months – seemed like an ideal opportunity to make quick progress on his expansionist agenda. But by provoking India, he may have bitten off more than he can chew.

Read Here | Project Syndicate

Why The Melting Of The Hindu Kush And Himalayan Glaciers Matters

Global warming is increasingly disrupting weather patterns and precipitation across the planet. In the Hindukush and Himalayan region, however, this will initially result in greater river flows by 2050-60 due to rapidly melting glaciers. Increase in water volumes will mean a higher risk of frequent floods, landslides, bursting of dams, soil erosion and crop failure.

Read Here – The Diplomat

The Geopolitics Of Language In The Himalayas

Photo by Kalle Kortelainen on Unsplash

The Himalayas are a global center for linguistic diversity. Setting out from Beijing or Delhi, the number of languages rises with altitude, conforming to global patterns that see linguistic diversity increasing in rough, mountainous terrain. This diversity is not neatly patterned: state, ethnicity, and language are not correlated. Knowing where someone lives or what identity they profess does not tell us what languages they speak.

Read Here – The Diplomat

Doklam, One Year Later: China’s Long Game In The Himalayas

Rather than offering lessons in deterrence, recent events in Doklam illustrate the complexities of convincing China to curb its territorial ambitions. In particular, India’s so-called “reset” with China in the months since the August 2017 settlement should raise doubts about its willingness to stand up to China and ability to be a net security provider as it faces increasing challenges to its role and influence in its Southern Asian neighbourhood.

Read Here – War On The Rocks

How Chinese Mining In The Himalayas May Create A New Military Flashpoint With India

China has begun large-scale mining operations on its side of the disputed border with India in the Himalayas, where a huge trove of gold, silver and other precious minerals – valued at nearly US$60 billion by Chinese state geologists – has been found.

Read Here – South China Morning Post

The Two Sides Of The Mountain

Separated from the rest of Asia by the world’s biggest mountains, India is the elephant on its own subcontinent. Leaving aside perennially hostile Pakistan, it has effortlessly dominated smaller neighbours much in the way that America does in the Caribbean: they may grumble and resent their sometimes clumsy big brother, but they have learned to stay out of its way. Lately, however, China’s increasingly bold advances are challenging India’s sway.

Read Here – The Economist

China Is Waging A Water War On India

Beijing is fashioning water into a political weapon by denying India flood-related hydrological data since May, even as major flooding has hit the region from Assam to Uttar Pradesh. Data on upstream river flows is essential for flood forecasting and warning in order to save lives and reduce material losses. China’s data denial crimps flash flood modelling in India.

Read Here – Hindustan Times

Nepal Torn Both Ways As Stand-Off Between India And China Continues

A senior Chinese official’s visit to Nepal next week will highlight the dilemma faced by the Himalayan country amid the ongoing standoff between its two giant neighbours China and India. Chinese Vice Premier Wang Yang’s four-day official visit to Kathmandu, starting on August 14, will come at a sensitive time as Beijing and New Delhi are at loggerheads over a protracted military standoff in the Himalayan Doklam plateau.

Read Here – South China Morning Post

Post Navigation

%d bloggers like this: