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looking beyond borders

foreign policy and global economy

Archive for the tag “Huawei”

The Improbable Rise Of Huawei

A decade ago, in 2009, the Swedish phone giant Teliasonera set out to build one of the world’s first fourth-generation wireless networks in some of Scandinavia’s most important—and technologically savviest—cities. For Oslo, Norway, Teliasonera made an audacious and unexpected choice of who would build it: Huawei, a Chinese company with little presence outside China and some other developing markets.

Read Here – Foreign Policy

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Huawei’s Problems Aren’t Just Political

Let’s face it: Huawei’s sinking reputation isn’t merely a victim of geopolitics. Way back in 2003, Huawei admitted copying some router software code from Cisco Systems Inc., which had sued the Chinese firm. Huawei had to remove the pilfered property. In 2010, Motorola Solutions Inc. sued Huawei for stealing its trade secrets, a case that was later settled. Now, part of the latest indictment accuses Huawei of snatching robotics technology from T-Mobile USA Inc..

Read Here – Bloomberg Opinion

Also Read: Trump, Huawei, And The Politics Of Extradition

Arrested Diplomacy

The Japanese and Canadian governments have failed to manage effectively the reputational, economic, and geopolitical implications of the legal cases against Nissan chairman Carlos Ghosn and Huawei CFO Meng Wanzhou. And, in a globalized world, the risks posed by such cases are likely to grow.

Read Here – Project Syndicate

Huawei Is the Doorway To China’s Police State

The arrest of Huawei Chief Financial Officer Meng Wanzhou was apparently a long time coming. U.S. investigators began looking into Huawei’s dealings when Iran’s once Chinese-backed ZTE was identified as a sanctions-breaker. U.S. prosecutors now appear to have substantial evidence of the Chinese Communist Party’s state-backed mobile and technology company’s violations of the sanctions regime against Iran.

Read Here – The National Interest

Why India Must Track China’s Development Plan

After Huawei, Xiaomi, and a number of Chinese smartphone producers, LeTV will launch its new smartphone in India early next year. With deepening engagement, China and India will have a bigger platform to cooperate. The upcoming 13th five-year plan is not only about China’s reform and innovation but also about the close integration and shared development of China and the world. China welcomes all countries to board its fast train of development, in pursuit of the shared dream of win-win cooperation, writes the Chines ambassador to India in The Indian Express

China Inc And Its Overseas Battles

Much as Japan Inc. caused a sensation with its buying spree in the eighties, acquiring prominent U.S. companies and landmarks, including Rockefeller Center, Chinese companies are making their presence felt. Acquisitions range from AMC cinemas to IBM’s personal computers unit.

Read Here – The Diplomat

Africa’s Big Brother

Chinese telecommunications giant Huawei may have been all-but-barred from doing business in the U.S. over allegations that it’s basically an intelligence agency masquerading as a tech business. In Africa, however, Huawei is thriving.

Read Here – Foreign Policy

China’s State-Owned Enterprises Not The Villains We’ve Been Told They Are

Like many of you I am eagerly awaiting the new James Bond film Skyfall, especially Javier Bardem’s star turn as Raoul Silva, the classic Bond villain with his outlandish plot to pay 60% over market price for a Canadian oil company.

No, wait, that’s from the business pages, isn’t it? You’ll forgive me: the stories sound so similar — or at any rate they’ve been made to sound similar. The casual reader would be convinced the $15.2-billion bid from China’s CNOOC for Canada’s Nexen, far from enriching Nexen’s shareholders and indirectly other Canadians, posed some dire threat to the country, if not the planet: part of some fiendish Chinese plan for world domination, possibly involving lasers.

Read Here – National Post

The Showdown Between China And The United States Over Telecommunications Technology Is About Much More Than Just Security

On Oct. 8, the House Select Intelligence Committee released a report on the cybersecurity threat posed by China‘s Huawei and ZTE, the world’s second- and fourth-largest telecommunications suppliers. The report, which described the companies as potential espionage risks and asked the U.S. government and U.S. firms to refrain from doing business with them, drew an angry response from Chinese media: XinhuaChina’s state news agencycalled its conclusions “totally groundless” and arising out of “protectionism”; the nationalistic tabloid Global Times said the United States is becoming an “unreasonable country”; and the state-run English language newspaper China Dailylabeled the accusations “unreasonable and unjustifiable.” But the fear of vulnerability from foreign technology, whether reasonable or not, is as present in China as it is in the United States — now more than ever.

Read Here – Foreign Policy

After U.S. Intel Report on Huawei, Chinese Netizens Call For Apple, Cisco Investigation

In a high-stakes game marrying geopolitics with big business and international espionage, is turnabout fair play? According to one very opinionated corner of the Chinese Internet, the answer is a resounding yes.

Yesterday, the U.S. House Permanent Select Committee on Intelligence released a report casting a heavy shadow over Chinese telecom behemoths Huawei and ZTE. The report held the two “failed to provide evidence that would satisfy any fair and full investigation” into their ties to Chinese intelligence-gathering operations, and recommended that both U.S. government entities and private enterprises avoid doing business with the two given “long-term security risks.” It also dispensed some free advice to Chinese companies: “Quickly become more open and transparent.”

 Read Here – Tea Leaf Nation

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