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looking beyond borders

foreign policy and global economy

Archive for the tag “Indian Ocean”

This Standoff Is China Telling India To Accept Changing Realities

China’s creeping encirclement of India confronts New Delhi with the choice of either accommodating itself to Chinese primacy or of hedging in partnership with the US and Japan against China’s advances, fuelling the regional rivalry even further.

Read Here – South China Morning Post

Also Read: This is India’s China War, round Two

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Has Asia Learned From The 1997 Crisis?

Reform is always easier when a crisis leaves policy makers no other options. But without further change, Asia will continue to rely too much on debt instead of productivity gains for growth. In poorer nations, improvements in household welfare will lag. As in the years before 1997, economic irregularities could build up to the point where the region faces another crisis. Will the next Kim Dae-jungs be there when you need them?

Read Here – Bloomberg View

Asian Sub Spending Spree Raises Risks Of Mistakes, Escalation

For more than a decade, Asian countries have been on a submarine spending spree. Some countries are updating obsolete vessels while others are purchasing submarines for the first time. This trend has largely been driven by growing concerns nations have over maintaining a deterrent against an increasingly assertive China broadly, but also rivalries with neighbours and a desire to maintain technological parity with rivals.

Read Here – The Cipher Brief

Also read:  Why Subs? To Send Neighbors a Powerful Message – “Stay Outta My Yard”

The $900 billion Question: What Is The Belt And Road initiative?

Courtesy: Global Times

In concrete terms, the Belt and Road initiative is an immensely ambitious development campaign through which China wants to boost trade and stimulate economic growth across Asia and beyond. It hopes to do so by building massive amounts of infrastructure connecting it to countries around the globe. By some estimates, China plans to pump $150bn into such projects each year. In a report released at the start of this year, ratings agency Fitch said an extraordinary $900 billion in projects were planned or underway.

Read Here – The Guardian

How China Rules The Waves

Investments into a vast network of harbours across the globe have made Chinese port operators the world leaders. Its shipping companies carry more cargo than those of any other nation — five of the top 10 container ports in the world are in mainland China with another in Hong Kong. Its coastguard has the globe’s largest maritime law enforcement fleet, its navy is the world’s fastest growing among major powers and its fishing armada numbers some 200,000 seagoing vessels.

Read Here – Financial Times

Why China Should Fear India’s Arms Sales To Vietnam (Think South China Sea)

India is poised to sell its sophisticated Akash missile defense system to Vietnam, the latest development in a broad strategic relationship that has grown rapidly in recent years and added a new twist to the spiralling power contest in the South China Sea.

Read Here – The National Interest

The Five Most Powerful Navies of 2030

Aircraft carrier INS Vikramaditya - Courtesy Indian Navy

Aircraft carrier INS Vikramaditya – Courtesy Indian Navy

The most powerful navies in 2030 will be a reflection of the broader state of the world. Some countries are invested in preserving the current international order, and see naval power as a means to maintain it. Other emerging countries are building navies commensurate with their newfound sense of status, often with an eye towards challenging that order.

Read Here – The National Interest

Asia-Pacific Military Power Balance Shifting Against The United States?

Courtesy: US Department of Defense

Courtesy: US Department of Defense

Geopolitically, most states in the Asia-Pacific region are embracing closer security and economic ties with the United States. At the same time, however, states across the region have become more sensitive to China’s growing political, economic, and military power, and are potentially vulnerable to Beijing’s increasingly coercive behavior. The U.S. relationship with China is complex, mixing elements of cooperation and competition.

Read Here – Center for Strategic and International Studies

China Defends Submarine Sales To Pakistan

In terms of military strength, the Indian Navy has two aircraft carriers in service and is building a new indigenous one. It has 15 submarines, almost twice that of Pakistan.  More importantly, India’s domestically developed nuclear-powered submarine, INS Arihant, has undergone several sea trials and will soon enter service. New Delhi is also planning at least six more nuclear-powered submarines. In comparison, it will take eight to 10 years for Pakistan to incorporate the eight submarines from China into its combat capacity. It will be extremely hard to break the military balance of India and Pakistan with the latest acquisition. Pakistan is actually trying to prevent the gap between its naval strength and India’s from widening, argues Qian Feng.

Read Here – Global Times

Concurrent India Drills Spark Unnecessary Speculation

The efforts of China and India moving closer have been snubbed by the West, which tries to hype the contention of the two sides. Given the border disputes between China and India, and geopolitical rivalry as well, mutual distrust is slow to dissolve, and India is vigilant against China’s rise. This creates opportunities for other countries to drive a wedge between Beijing and New Delhi. But China and India have reached a solid consensus that continued growth in bilateral relations should not be thwarted by divergences.

Read Here – Global Times

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