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looking beyond borders

foreign policy and global economy

Archive for the tag “Indian Ocean”

How India Will React To The Rise Of China: The Soft-Balancing Strategy Reconsidered

It may well be possible to manage the China-India rivalry, but with each passing year, India’s challenges vis-a-vis China are becoming more intractable. Until recently, the rivalry centered on the territorial conflict over the un-demarcated Himalayan border….Beyond the territorial dispute, today the rivalry encompasses competition over water sharing (especially due to China’s efforts to dam the water that flows from Tibet into the Brahmaputra River), trade imbalance, membership in international institutions, and China’s foray into India’s traditional sphere of influence in the Indian Ocean as well as India’s own increasing interests in the Asia-Pacific and Africa.

Read Here – WarOnTheRocks

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India Should Give Up Zero-sum Mindset Toward China-Maldives Cooperation

As the Maldives celebrates the opening of the China-Maldives Friendship Bridge – a project Maldivians describe as the project of the century and a dream come true – there was no congratulations from its neighbour to the north. In fact, Indian officials and media, on the contrary, went out of their way to try and discredit the bridge.

Read Here – Global Times

China’s Navy Could Soon Have An Aircraft Carrier Battle Group

The Chinese People’s Liberation Army Navy (PLAN) is a step closer to achieving its goal of deploying a full-scale aircraft carrier battle group. In recent days, China’s first indigenously built aircraft carrier, Shandong, embarked on its second set of sea trials. Meanwhile, the PLAN also started sea trials for the first of its massive new Type 055 guided-missile destroyers , reportedly called Nanchang, on August 24.

Read Here – The National Interest

Maldives Wants India To Withdraw Helicopters, Personnel Even As It Woos China

India and China are going head to head in the Maldives, the Indian Ocean island chain where Beijing is building roads, bridges and a bigger airport, upstaging India which has been the country’s prime provider of military and civilian aid for decades.

Read Here – The Indian Express

Modi Wants No Part Of China-US Rivalry, But Still Manages To Keep Beijing Happy

Indian Prime Minister Narendra Modi delivering the keynote address at the Shangri La Dialogue, in Singapore on June 1, 2018. Photo/PIB

With Washington’s Indo-Pacific strategy set to boost India’s role in the region, New Delhi is working hard to avoid being caught in the middle of the growing rivalry between China and the United States, observers said. That might have explained why Indian Prime Minister Narendra Modi appeared to avoid mentioning the “quadrilateral strategic dialogue” – a US-led grouping of four regional powers including Australia, Japan and India, also known as “the Quad” – during his speech at the Shangri-La Dialogue, a regional security summit, in Singapore over the weekend.

Read Here- South China Morning Post

India’s Struggle For The Soul Of The Indo-Pacific

In the western Indian Ocean, a battle for the soul of the Indo-Pacific is set to play out between China and the liberal order hitherto led by the US, and increasingly represented by India. While New Delhi and Beijing have initiated a tentative rapprochement, their interests do not align.

Read Here – Lowy Institute

India And Pakistan Are Quietly Making Nuclear War more Likely

The Pakistan navy is likely to soon place nuclear-tipped cruise missiles on up to three of its five French-built diesel-electric submarines. It has also reached a deal with China to buy eight more diesel-electric attack submarines that can be equipped with nuclear weapons. These are scheduled for delivery in 2028. Even more disturbing, Pakistani military authorities say they are considering the possibility of putting nuclear-tipped cruise missiles on surface vessels like the Zulfiqar.

Read Here – Vox

Small Dots, Large Strategic Areas: US Interests In The South Pacific

Given the rapidly shifting geopolitical landscape – or, more accurately, seascape – of the South Pacific, the region poses several strategic challenges to the US and its allies. As Australian National University’s Joanne Wallis has argued, over the past several years the South Pacific has seen the creation of alternative regional institutions, increasing Chinese investment and strategic focus, diminished New Zealand and Australian influence, and US strategic neglect.

Read Here – The Lowy Institute

In South Asia, Chinese Infrastructure Brings Debt And Antagonism

China makes no secret of its interest in the Indian Ocean, which contains vital sea lanes along which a large share of its imports and exports pass. It has not been shy about trying to curry favour with littoral and island states through its Belt and Road Initiative, a massive project to invest in infrastructure along ancient and modern trading routes.

Read Here – The Economist

A New Order For The Indo-Pacific

China has transformed the Indo-Pacific region’s strategic landscape in just five years. If other powers do not step in to counter further challenges to the territorial and maritime status quo, the next five years could entrench China’s strategic advantages.

Read Here – Project Syndicate

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