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Archive for the tag “influence”

Who Is Winning The China-US Race To Run The World Amid The Covid-19 Pandemic?

The conflict between Washington and Beijing over the WHO’s conduct has been thrown into sharp relief because the pandemic has killed more than 217,000 people and infected over 3 million, with an especially large toll in the United States. Yet, it is just emblematic of the much broader struggle for hearts and minds playing out between the two powers, which is now raising another question: who is winning?

Read Here – South China Morning Post

The New Spheres Of Influence

Unipolarity is over, and with it the illusion that other nations would simply take their assigned place in a U.S.-led international order. For the United States, that will require accepting the reality that there are spheres of influence in the world today—and that not all of them are American spheres.

Read Here – Foreign Affairs

In Central Asia, Can China Really Compete With Russia?

For Russia, maintaining influence in the post-Soviet Central Asian states is critical. These countries form a key buffer zone for Russia, separating the country from unstable areas of the Middle East and terrorist elements. Russia is concerned that terrorist and extremist influences could spread to its southern border and into the Caucasus through Central Asia and threaten to destabilize its southern and eastern regions.

Read Here – Geopolitical Futures

China Is Waging A Silent Media War For Global Influence

Beijing is expanding its ability to influence societies around the world through its exercise of soft power. This is best exemplified by its Belt and Road Initiative, but there is another, more stealthy effort occurring along-side it that has potentially profound implications for Chinese foreign policy—Beijing’s growing influence in the Western press. China’s state-run media companies are expanding their integration with Western news outlets and having some surprisingly significant impacts.

Read Here – The National Interest

The Two Sides Of The Mountain

Separated from the rest of Asia by the world’s biggest mountains, India is the elephant on its own subcontinent. Leaving aside perennially hostile Pakistan, it has effortlessly dominated smaller neighbours much in the way that America does in the Caribbean: they may grumble and resent their sometimes clumsy big brother, but they have learned to stay out of its way. Lately, however, China’s increasingly bold advances are challenging India’s sway.

Read Here – The Economist

The Hajj: An Expression Of Saudi Power

The annual multiday Islamic pilgrimage known as the hajj began Aug. 31. Each year, a few million Muslims from across the globe flock to Islam’s two holiest mosques, in Mecca and Medina, to perform their religious obligation. But the hajj is more than a religious pilgrimage; it’s an expression of Saudi power. Stewardship over the sacred mosques in Mecca and Medina, and thus the control of the hajj, gives the monarchy in Riyadh a legitimacy no other country that claims to be a leader of the Islamic world has, especially among Sunni Arabs.

Read Here – Geopolitical Futures

In The Withdrawal From The Paris Climate Agreement, The Koch Brokers’ Campaign Becomes Overt

President Trump may be the face of America’s withdrawal from the Paris climate accord, but, as deeper reporting is making clear, it’s the Kochs and their fellow fossil-fuel industry donors who really own the policy. Whether responsibility for such a consequential move will redound to their favour remains to be seen.

Read Here – The New Yorker

Why Saudi Arabia And Egypt Are Competing For Influence In Africa

Some Middle Eastern countries are showing a great deal of interest in Africa these days, and although Africa seems to welcome the attention, it can do without the drama.

Read Here – Al-Monitor

If Xi Stumbles

For Xi, even the slightest perception of a stumble is politically risky. In the two-and-a-half years since he came to power, his anti-corruption drive has turned many of his former comrades into bitter enemies. The bureaucracy, frozen in fear and outraged about the loss of many of its privileges, including entitlements to bribes, may well be cheering the apparent comeuppance of China’s new strongman. Xi’s rivals, cowed by his sheer display of power and momentum not too long ago, may smell blood now.

Read Here – The Indian Express

Xi And China’s Foreign Policy

Xi has given a lot of attention to foreign policy, and allocates a substantial portion of his time to diplomacy. So what will Xi Jinping’s diplomacy be – and how will it differ from his predecessor, former President Hu Jintao?

Read Here – The Diplomat

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