Who’s Afraid Of A Balance Of Power?

If you took an introduction to international relations course in college and the instructor never mentioned the “balance of power,” please contact your alma mater for a refund. You can find this idea in Thucydides’s Peloponnesian War, Thomas Hobbes’s Leviathan, and the ancient Indian writer Kautilya’s Arthashastra (“Science of Politics”), and it is central to the work of modern […]

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Economists Versus The Economy

Today’s professional economists, by contrast, have studied almost nothing but economics. They don’t even read the classics of their own discipline. Economic history comes, if at all, from data sets. Philosophy, which could teach them about the limits of the economic method, is a closed book. Mathematics, demanding and seductive, has monopolized their mental horizons. […]

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Can China Explode?

Xi’s prolonged attack on civil society—crackdowns, one right after the other—is only increasing the pressure in the country, and that is occurring while the tolerance of the population is decreasing. Read Here – World Affairs Journal

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Xi’s foreign debut illuminates China’s ‘world dream’

On Friday, Chinese President Xi Jinping embarked on his first overseas trip sincetaking office last week, and experts here believe the trip will clarify Xi’s recent references to China’s “world dream.” Shi Yinhong, a professor of international relations at Renmin University of China, said, “The tripwill reveal some important features of Xi’s concept of world order. “”From the destinations of Xi’s first foreign trip, we can tell that China is committed to promotingdemocratization in international relations as well as a more just and reasonable internationalorder and system,” he said. Read Here – China Daily

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The Challenge From China: Fareed Zakaria

Secretary of State John Kerry’s first foreign trip is an impressive swing through nine countries in Europe and the Middle East. But I wonder if he should instead have visited just two countries, China and Japan. That’s where the most significant and dangerous new developments in international relations are unfolding. The world’s second- and third-largest […]

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How the Vatican Does Foreign Policy

As Pope Benedict XVI abdicates the papacy, retiring to a life of prayer and study, he leaves behind an admirable, if somewhat chequered, record in international relations. His influence in foreign affairs — like that of all popes — has been considerable. As a truly global body with over a billion members, the world’s oldest […]

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The Asian Sleepwalkers

Whether East Asia’s politicians and pundits like it or not, the region’s current international relations are more akin to nineteenth-century European balance-of-power politics than to the stable Europe of today. Witness East Asia’s rising nationalism, territorial disputes, and lack of effective institutional mechanisms for security cooperation. While economic interdependence among China, Japan, South Korea, and […]

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