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Archive for the tag “Iran”

The Clock Is Ticking For Biden On Iran

This diplomatic process, which is crucial to avoiding further conflict in the Middle East and allowing President Biden to focus on competition with China, will falter unless the Biden administration moves quickly. American negotiators should list the sanctions that the United States is prepared to remove in exchange for Iranian compliance.

Read Here | NYTimes

China Rising Across The Middle East

Shaking hands and signing deals from Abu Dhabi to Ankara, Tehran to Riyadh, Chinese Foreign Minister Wang Yi’s recent Middle Eastern tour once again demonstrated China’s growing influence in the region. Yet, while the trip saw some impressive numbers talked and important political statements made, the visit may have had more to do with a country many miles from the region: the United States.

Read Here | Asia Times

India Has Key First-Mover Edge On China In Iran

When China clinched a massive $400 billion bilateral investment pact with Iran, a 25-year deal that seeks to revive the heavily sanctioned and economically isolated nation, few noted that India was already well-engaged. By the end of May, India will begin full-scale operations in its first foreign port venture at Iran’s Chabahar, a facility that opens on the Gulf of Oman that will aim to facilitate more South Asia, Central Asia and Middle East trade while bypassing Pakistan.

Read Here | Asia Times

After Anchorage, China Will Make Iran Its Gas Station If America Turns A Blind Eye

If the United States is no longer rigorously enforcing sanctions, then Iran’s glut of deeply-discounted oil represents an attractive and ready source, and China can groom the Islamic Republic to function as its gas station with impunity.

Read Here | The National Interest

The Other Carter Doctrine

The Carter that emerges from the historical record—including some recently declassified documents—is an Iran hawk: imploring the wobbly shah to forcibly suppress the revolution; trying to instigate a coup to save the monarchy; and, after the revolution, committing the United States to a policy of regime change.

Read Here | Foreign Affairs

Why Is American Foreign Policy Tilting Towards Iran?

An open question remains as to the source of this infatuation with Iran … The answer may have to do with some ideological affinity: the revolutionary character of the Islamic Republic may appeal to parts of the liberal Democratic spectrum, while the generally conservative Republicans are more comfortable with stable monarchies.

Read Here | The National Interest

Also Read | How Biden Will End the Trump Sugar High for Israel and Saudi Arabia

Biden Deprioritises The Middle East

President Joe Biden is tired of dealing with the Middle East — and, barely a month into his tenure, the region has noticed. The signals are not meant to be subtle, his advisers say. The president has made only one call to a head of state in the Middle East — Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu on Wednesday — which itself was delayed by more than three weeks and followed calls to other allies and even adversaries like Russia and China. 

Read Here – Politico

China And Russia Have Iran’s Back

China and Russia are now integrally involved in Iran’s affairs, from its oil and port infrastructure to its defense capabilities. The result of this deepening collaboration has been to make Iran far less susceptible than it once was, either to Trump’s campaign of “maximum pressure” or to Biden’s hoped-for engagement.

Read Here | Foreign Affairs

Iran’s New Doctrine: Pivot To The East

Over the past few months, Iran  has been working with China on a sweeping long-term political, economic, and security agreement that would facilitate hundreds of billions of dollars of investments in the Iranian economy. It is also pursuing a long-term partnership with Russia. Politicians in Tehran see the agreements as a necessary means of combating U.S. hegemony and hostility.

Read Here | The Diplomat

The Middle East’s New Map

The imminent establishment of diplomatic relations between Israel and two Gulf states, the United Arab Emirates and Bahrain, is part of an on-going process of security cooperation going back many years. While that robs the event of some drama, it also increases its significance. It means that the process of ending the era of Arab-Israeli confrontation will continue, culminating perhaps in a political upheaval in Iran. That is the road that the Middle East may now be on.

Read Here | The National Interest

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