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Archive for the tag “ISIS”

You Can’t Understand ISIS If You Don’t Know The History Of Wahhabism In Saudi Arabia

It is not hard to understand how the founding of the Islamic State by ISIS in contemporary Iraq might resonate amongst those who recall this history. Indeed, the ethos of 18th century Wahhabism did not just wither in Nejd, but it roared back into life when the Ottoman Empire collapsed amongst the chaos of World War I.

Read Here – Huffington Post

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Seven Disturbing Implications Of Trump’s Syria Strike

The attack raises a series of questions about the president’s approach to America’s political processes and institutions.

Read Here – Defense One

The U.S. Military Loves The Obama Doctrine. Can It Survive Trump?

What comes next in Iraq is on everyone’s mind. Trump will inherit Iraq, its internal ethnic divides and external pressures between Iran and Saudi Arabia. He will inherit a complex, deliberate way of war solidified over eight years by Obama, yet born of the experiences of U.S. generals — including several who will now serve at the highest levels.

Read Here – Defense One

Obama Wasn’t Weak On Foreign Policy – He Was Just Wise Enough To Realise That Asia, Not America, Is The Future

As the Trump presidency nears, it has suddenly become fashionable to downplay the achievements of Barack Obama, not least because the President-elect seems so keen on ripping up much of what he did. One view in particular has become popular: that Obama pursued a weak foreign policy, which is to blame for many of the problems facing the world today.

Read Here – The Independent

Think National Security Is Complicated Now? Wait Until Trump Gets Started

President Barack Obama meets with President-elect Donald Trump in the Oval Office, Nov. 10, 2016. (Official White House Photo by Pete Souza)

President Barack Obama meets with President-elect Donald Trump in the Oval Office, Nov. 10, 2016. (Official White House Photo by Pete Souza)

 

DONALD TRUMP IS the next commander in chief. Envisioning a Trump foreign and defense policy challenges the imagination and leaves allies abroad and observers at home scrambling to sketch a vision of the future. As a candidate, Trump didn’t outline his policies in detail, and his previous thoughts on a given issue aren’t terribly reliable indicators of current or future ones.

Read Here – Wired

Obama’s Failed Middle East policy

The tumultuous events that have swept the Mideast like a whirling sandstorm have hardly abated; crises and conflict are now entrenched. Thus, looking back at the results of President Barack Obama’s two-term legacy, it’s clear we are facing a Mideast meltdown with dangerous and far-reaching consequences for the region and the world at large.

Read Here – China Post

War Goes Viral

Like most every­thing today, the campaign was launched with a hashtag. But instead of promoting a new album or a movie release, #AllEyesOnISIS announced the 2014 invasion of northern Iraq—a bloody takeover that still haunts global politics two years later.

Read Here – Defense One

Iran’s Struggles On Four Fronts—And Soon, Maybe A Fifth

Nearly twelve months after Iran’s diplomatic victory with the JCPOA, Tehran is still embroiled in four different major regional conflicts, and a fifth may soon break out.

Read Here – The National Interest

The World’s Most Prolific Terrorists: The Taliban

Unsurprisingly, terrorism remains the preferred tactic of relatively weaker non-state actors who believe they can achieve their political objectives through violence. There has been a slight change in the perpetrators responsible for the most attacks. The Taliban replaced the self-proclaimed Islamic State as the number-one global perpetrator for terrorism attacks, with 1,093, which represents an alarming increase of 69 percent since 2013.

Read Here – The Atlantic

U.S. Department of State Country Reports on Terrorism

The United States Could Learn Lessons From Russia’s Foray Into Syria

As all sides weigh in on why President Putin decided to “withdraw” from Syria, Russian military action presents lessons for the United States on how to conduct future wars. The primary lesson seen in Syria was remarkably simple: clear and concise goals trump grandiose visions of regime change or nation building when intervening in conflicts.

Read Here – The National Interest

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